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  1. Good Thing

    Bucket Umbrella Stand

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    Transform an inexpensive flower bucket into a nice-looking umbrella stand by painting the bottom of the bucket with glossy oil-based enamel paint. In addition to providing color, the paint will help disguise any rust caused by dripping umbrellas. Mark the bottom third of a tall galvanized bucket (available at garden centers) with painters' tape; prime and paint this area and the bottom of the bucket. Let dry 24 hours before removing tape.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, April 2008
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Made for Hanging

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    Homemade hangers preserve the shape of tall boots and maximize space. They're created by replacing the knobs on cedar boot trees with large cup hooks, which are screwed into the tops. The trees and boots then hang from a cafe-curtain rod.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  3. Dust Jackets

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    Twenty-inch cloth napkins (or same-size squares of fabric) become protective covers for coats and vests that don't need to be stored in garment bags. Each is pierced in the center and reinforced with a grommet to slide over a hanger.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  4. Sized to Fit

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    These oak-veneer cubbies are the ideal dimensions (about 10 inches square and 14 inches deep) for holding folded sweaters and pressed shirts. Painted and labeled wooden boxes are used inside the cubbies to corral garment- and shoe-care items and toiletries.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  5. Support Staff

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    Tall-growing orchids need a little extra support to stay upright, but the stakes they lean on are usually an eyesore. For ones that won't detract from the beauty of the blooms, purchase precut 16- to 18-gauge floral-stem wire from a crafts store. Bend into a 90-degree angle 4 inches from the top. Curve the top portion to form a U. Plant the stake next to the orchid, and hook the U around the stem.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, February 2008
  6. More Home & Garden Ideas