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  1. Putting Down Roots

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    Step aside, pumpkins -- here's an unexpected and inviting accent for the dinner table. We used daikon radishes and turnips, but any root vegetable will work. Using a knife, slice off enough of the leafy top to create a flat base. Insert black-headed pushpins to form eyes; for the mouth, cut a half-moon into the vegetable with a paring knife, and fill it in with a black marker. Arrange several in a shallow bowl, varying the heights and the shapes.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, October 2007
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Roses and Kale Basket

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    This unusual pairing features two items with similar budlike shapes: creamy-white roses and emerald-green ornamental kale.

    Basket How-To
    If your basket has gaps in its sides, weave a ribbon through the rungs. Next, tuck a plastic liner inside, and then trim a block of floral foam to fit. Soak the foam in water and set it in the liner. Push the kale and rose stems into it. Do the same with sprigs of pine around the edges. Finish by wrapping branches of pine around the handle, securing them with floral wire. The display will stay fresh for several days.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, Volume 145 December 2005
  3. Magician Cape

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    All we did to transform a mere 7-year-old boy to a mighty magician was use a fabric marker to draw a tie and collar onto a white T-shirt, affix a fake carnation to his lapel, and tie a black-and-red satin cape around his neck. And lo and behold: a levitating maestro ready to make piles of candy disappear.

    Cape How-To
    This unadorned cape falls just above the knee. You will need black satin and red satin fabric and two 14-inch pieces of red satin ribbon for ties. Make the cape following the basic directions. Stitch the ribbons securely to either side of the neck.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Kids, Volume 9 2003
  4. Cutting Woven Fabrics

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    Use this tailor's trick whenever you need to cut a straight line through a woven fabric such as cotton or linen. Tease several threads loose at the point where you'll make the initial cut. Then gently pull out the threads to create a trail of perfectly aligned holes in the fabric, which can then guide your shears.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, April 2008
  5. Sewing Kit in a Jar

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    With just a little retrofitting, an old-fashioned Mason jar can become a new sewing kit with a built-in pincushion on top. To begin, separate the lid's sealer and screw cap. Trace around sealer on cardboard. Using a compass, draw another circle on linen or cotton, 1 inch larger in diameter than the first. Cut out both circles; make cushion by placing batting between fabric and cardboard. Turn screw cap upside down, and apply hot glue to inside edge of rim; quickly press cushion into lid until cloth protrudes smoothly above screw cap's opening and cardboard is flush against rim. Apply hot glue around edge of cardboard, fold over excess fabric, and press down. Glue top of sealer to cardboard. Fill jar.

     

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, August 2006
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