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  1. Herb Sachet for Cooking

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    Sachets of aromatic herbs, such as the classic bouquet garni of thyme, parsley, and bay leaves, add flavor to simmering soups, stews, stocks, and braises. But fishing these cheesecloth bundles out of the pot can be difficult. The next time you use one of the herb packets, tie a length of butcher's twine to the sachet, and then tie the loose end to one of the pot's handles. (Be sure the twine stays clear of the burner.) When the time comes, the bouquet garni will be easy to retrieve and remove.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2009
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  2. Pigs in a Blanket with Puff Pastry Dough

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    Wrap a hot dog with dough, and adhere seam with beaten egg. Refrigerate for 20 minutes. Brush with egg. Slice into bite-size pieces. Transfer to a baking sheet, and bake at 400 degrees until golden, about 15 minutes. Serve with mustard.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, June 2010
  3. Gravy Tips with Joan Cusack

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    Martha answers Joan Cusack's questions about making gravy with a smooth consistency for Thanksgiving.

    Resources
    For complete step-by-step instructions, see our how-to: Making Perfect Turkey Gravy

    Source
    The Martha Stewart Show, November 2009
  4. Dessert Party Favors

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    Leftover dessert doubles as guest favors when packaged in boxes that are as pretty as, well, pie. Photocopy template at 400 percent; trace onto card stock. Cut out the image with scallop scissors along scalloped edges and regular scissors on solid lines. With a straightedge and a bone folder, score paper along dotted lines. Fold along scored lines, and secure tabs with double-sided tape. Line box with parchment paper, place a slice inside, and tie on a tag.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, November 2007
  5. Herb-Infused Cocktails

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    Mint-packed mojitos and juleps might be the most famous examples, but all kinds of cocktails will perk up when herbs are added to the mix. Muddling is the key to extracting the herbs' flavors and fragrant oils, done with a traditional bar tool similar to a mortar and pestle but gentler on delicate leaves, or the end of a wooden spoon. Here are four herbalicious drinks from our test kitchen.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2011
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