No Thanks
Let

Keep In Touch With MarthaStewart.com

Sign up and we'll send inspiration straight to you.

Martha Stewart takes your privacy seriously. To learn more, please read our Privacy Policy.

  1. Garden-Shed Crate Cabinets

    Hide

    Create custom cabinetry in your garden shed with vintage wine crates from flea markets or online auctions. Stack them horizontally and vertically, using some as bases to vary heights. Once you've established a layout, connect crates with wood screws and collars near the corners. Use cup hooks to hang smaller items, such as trowels, funnels, and scissors. If your need for storage grows, you can easily reconfigure the system.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2009
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Sliding Storage

    Hide

    Normally used in kitchens, a pull-out pantry becomes a shoe closet when the shelves are installed at an angle; professional assistance is recommended for this project. Nonskid shelf liners prevent pairs from sliding when the unit moves.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  3. Surprising Garden Pots: Electrical Boxes

    Hide

    Steel utility boxes from the hardware store make sleek, modern pots. Choose a range of shapes and sizes. Turn so that the side with holes is at the bottom, and plant with low-growing succulents, such as Echeveria 'Black Prince' (left) and Sempervivum; top with gravel. (We used no. 2 grade grit.) For an exotic centerpiece, arrange several in a tray filled with grit.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2006
  4. Plant Protector

    Hide

    An office in-box can work hard outside, too. Turn one upside down and place it over young plants to protect them from curious cats and other creatures. The metal grid keeps pets from uprooting and trampling delicate plants, such as herbs, and will allow your plants to grow freely.

     

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2004
  5. Basic First-Aid Kit

    Hide

    When you need first-aid supplies most, you're usually not in the best frame of mind to search for them. A well-stocked first-aid kit keeps the items you need easy to find. Bandages, adhesive tape, gauze, and scissors are useful. To clean wounds, keep hydrogen peroxide or isopropyl alcohol (and cotton balls or swabs to apply it) on hand as well as antibiotic ointment (check expiration date). A first-aid kit is also a good place to store pain relievers.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2004
  6. More Home & Garden Ideas