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  1. Crisped Prosciutto

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    Prosciutto is a delightfully crisp accent for soups, pastas, and salads. Arrange the prosciutto slices on a parchment-lined baking sheet, and bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes. For the crunchiest texture, allow the prosciutto to cool before serving.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, October 2007
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  2. Parfait Breakfast

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    If you let them, your kids would eat ice-cream sundaes for breakfast. Offer them the next best thing: sundaes made with yogurt, cereal, granola, and fresh fruit layered in tall sundae glasses and eaten with long spoons. For special occasions, such as the morning after the big slumber party, lay out a parfait buffet and let kids make their own.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Kids, Volume 3 2002
  3. Dilly Beans and Spiced Nuts

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    Give a Bloody Mary lover a batch of delectable homemade dilly beans. The spicy, pickled green beans make a tasty, unexpected garnish (and are equally enjoyable on their own). 

    Add two types of flavored nuts -- spicy almonds and smoky cashews -- for serving alongside. Finish the gifts with simple paper toppers (round for the beans and wide bands for the nuts) secured with twine. 

    Download our clip-art label and a Bloody Mary recipe to complete the presentation.

  4. Yogurt on a Stick

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    A container of yogurt transformed into an ice pop isn't just a yummy treat for kids -- its lid can catch messy drips. Open a 6-ounce container of fruit yogurt; drain excess liquid, and stir. Add a couple of teaspoons of berries and granola on top, pressing into yogurt a bit. Cut a slit in the lid, just large enough to insert a large craft stick. Put lid back on; insert stick halfway into yogurt. Freeze at least 5 hours. To unmold, dip cup into bowl of warm water.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Kids, 2004
  5. Good Thing

    Roasted Applesauce

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    A childhood favorite grows up in this sophisticated update on applesauce, which boasts an intense caramelized flavor, thanks to a base of roasted apples. It's also an excellent way to make use of fruit left over from fall apple picking. Simply roast the whole fruit with brown sugar and butter until softened, and then use a food mill to puree and separate out the skins and seeds. Stir in your favorite spices and enjoy the sweet harvest.

    Roasted Applesauce Recipe

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, November 2007
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