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  1. Squeeze More Room Out of Small Quarters

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    In the compact laundry workstation and storage area of a small bathroom, the stacked European-style washer-dryer set economizes space. A shelf between units pulls out for folding items fresh from the dryer, then slides out of sight. A matchstick shade lowers all the way to the floor, gracefully hiding the utility area when guests are expected.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2005, October 2005
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  2. Surprising Garden Pots: Electrical Boxes

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    Steel utility boxes from the hardware store make sleek, modern pots. Choose a range of shapes and sizes. Turn so that the side with holes is at the bottom, and plant with low-growing succulents, such as Echeveria 'Black Prince' (left) and Sempervivum; top with gravel. (We used no. 2 grade grit.) For an exotic centerpiece, arrange several in a tray filled with grit.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2006
  3. Accessory Haven

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    Square acrylic organizers give ties and belts their own homes. Underneath, blue acid-free mat board lines the drawer for extra color. Additional trays are cushioned with coordinating felt to protect the jewelry inside.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  4. By A Thread

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    Sometimes the perfect thread for a sewing project comes on a spool that's imperfectly sized for your sewing machine. The solution: Place the spool in a heavy mug, and position it on your work surface directly underneath the spool pin. Take hold of the thread end, and hook it over the spool pin before threading it into the machine as usual (the thread should form a 90-degree angle); the thread will unravel smoothly as you work.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2008
  5. Winter Tulip Arrangement

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    The holidays may be over, but with this arrangement you can extend the season's charms -- and its fragrant greenery. Just snip some branches off the Christmas tree before it heads to the compost heap, and place them in a vase. To offset the fir's stiffness, add cedar and seeded eucalyptus. Finally, the luxurious touch: a few dozen white tulips from your florist. Voila: a fresh display to welcome the New Year.

    A tall, egg-shaped vase such as this ceramic one supports the weak-stemmed tulips and emphasizes the arrangement's loose, natural feel. Verso vase, in Sage, calvinklein.com.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2011
  6. Good Thing

    Garden Rolodex

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    Trim a plant tag at its base, place it photo-side up on a shipping tag, and staple it near one end so you can easily read the flip side. Group the tags on key rings, and make notes about where you sited the plants in the garden or pots.

    Shipping tags (similar to shown), 5 3/4 inches by 2 7/8 inches, $29.37 for 1,000, by Avery; officeworld.com.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, July 2011
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