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  1. Furniture Footprints

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    Before you spend an afternoon rearranging the furniture (or invest in a new set), do a trial run with a set of paper templates -- no heavy lifting required. Measure dimensions of each piece, then transfer them onto kraft paper. Cut out the templates, label them, then lay them on the floor in the intended spots. If you feel like leaving the templates for a few days (to ensure that the new arrangement flows well and is practical), stick them in place with safe-release painter's tape.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, September 2006
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Shelf Within a Shelf

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    Make the most of your cupboard real estate by adding another level of storage for glassware. Cut a piece of nonskid shelf liner (available at home-supply stores) to line a serving tray and a cupboard shelf; this will help glasses stay put and protect the rims. Place glasses used less frequently upside down on the shelf, set tray on top, and arrange everyday glasses upside down on tray.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, August 2006
  3. Cut and Carry

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    Here's a convenient way to transport flats of blooms you've purchased and recycle a shopping bag at the same time. Start with a large paper bag that has handles. Cut the bag along both long sides of a side panel. Repeat on other side. Fold cut panels in to create more support at the base of the carrier; trim excess paper. Store carrier in the trunk of your car to reuse as necessary.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2008
  4. Hiding Supplies

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    Keep laundry supplies tidy and out of sight with built-in shelves and a curtain that can be pulled across them when the laundry is done. Mothballs and cedar chips are stored in canning jars, and little bars of soap are kept in airtight containers. Towels for drying hand-washables are stacked on one shelf. Special stain remedies are kept together in a galvanized metal box; detergent is in a large plastic container with a scoop for easy measuring.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2004
  5. Orchids: Out of the Vase, into the Strainer

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    Gutter strainers -- the wire cages that filter leaves and debris washed off the roof -- also make great orchid pots, providing the plants with excellent aeration and drainage. 

    Buy an inexpensive copper strainer at a hardware store. Using a pair of light pliers, bend the spindly legs of the strainer into decorative loops around the top (the loops also offer a way to hang the orchid if you like). Soak sphagnum moss (available at garden centers) in water, pack into the strainer, and then put in the orchid. Pack with more moss for a snug fit, and give it a hearty watering in the sink. Let the moss drain completely before placing the plant in a bowl.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, November 2008
  6. Rustic Watering Can Flower Arrangement

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    The utility of the classic metal watering can goes beyond the sprinkling of H2O onto thirsty plants -- it also makes an attractive vessel for cut flowers.

    For a spring arrangement, fill the container with peonies, white lilacs, ranunculus, tulips, stock, and/or narcissus.

    The bouquet cleverly nods to the life-sustaining function of the watering can, and it makes a great gift for any gardener or flower fan.

    Source
    The Martha Stewart Show, April 2011
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas