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  1. A Better Stake

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    After pruning trees and shrubs in the yard, save the trimmed branches to support returning perennials, such as lilies. They'll be free and plentiful, not to mention more natural looking than metal or plastic spikes. Look for branches with lots of little twigs, and stake three to five of them around each plant. As the plant grows, its foliage will gradually wind around the network of twigs.

     

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, July 2006
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Double Stacked

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    Four divided trays, painted orange, become a layered jewelry organizer. Two trays lie flat along the drawer bottom. The remaining two, joined with wood glue, form the top shelf; it is elevated by strips of 1-inch square molding affixed to the inner sides of the drawer.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  3. This End Up

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    Tame your T-shirts by folding them into thirds and arranging them folded-end up in the drawer, rather than flat (this is an overhead view). Metal bookends, painted blue and outfitted with rubber surface protectors, hold the shirts upright, letting you see each one.

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    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  4. Safe and Warm

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    Wool scarves and mittens are ready to wear from one season to the next when wrapped in acid-free tissue paper and slipped into labeled craft boxes (available at organizing stores). The boxes are then stowed inside shallow drawers.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  5. Garden-Shed Crate Cabinets

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    Create custom cabinetry in your garden shed with vintage wine crates from flea markets or online auctions. Stack them horizontally and vertically, using some as bases to vary heights. Once you've established a layout, connect crates with wood screws and collars near the corners. Use cup hooks to hang smaller items, such as trowels, funnels, and scissors. If your need for storage grows, you can easily reconfigure the system.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2009
  6. Basic First-Aid Kit

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    When you need first-aid supplies most, you're usually not in the best frame of mind to search for them. A well-stocked first-aid kit keeps the items you need easy to find. Bandages, adhesive tape, gauze, and scissors are useful. To clean wounds, keep hydrogen peroxide or isopropyl alcohol (and cotton balls or swabs to apply it) on hand as well as antibiotic ointment (check expiration date). A first-aid kit is also a good place to store pain relievers.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2004
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas