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  1. A Better Stake

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    After pruning trees and shrubs in the yard, save the trimmed branches to support returning perennials, such as lilies. They'll be free and plentiful, not to mention more natural looking than metal or plastic spikes. Look for branches with lots of little twigs, and stake three to five of them around each plant. As the plant grows, its foliage will gradually wind around the network of twigs.

     

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, July 2006
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Good Thing

    Floral Teas on Display

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    Fragrant floral teas find a handsome home in glass canisters, where their soft hues are on full display.

    Simply fill your favorite jars with colorful varieties of loose tea petals -- we like chamomile, violet, red rose, jasmine, jasmine-scented flowering, and plum berry teas -- and arrange together for a striking counter adornment.

    It's not only an attractive display, but also a convenient reminder of the varieties you have on hand.

    Source
    The Martha Stewart Show, Episode 5128
  3. Self-Contained

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    Open storage cubes, available at organizing stores, rein in piles of folded shirts and sweaters and keep them from toppling over. The movable cubbies also provide support for the stacks on either side.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  4. Dust Jackets

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    Twenty-inch cloth napkins (or same-size squares of fabric) become protective covers for coats and vests that don't need to be stored in garment bags. Each is pierced in the center and reinforced with a grommet to slide over a hanger.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  5. Towel Tune-Up

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    Are your towels holding less water than they used to? It may be that your choice of washing detergent contains fabric softener, which has residues that cling to individual fibers, rendering towels less absorbent. The next time you clean a load, add a cup of distilled white vinegar to the rinse cycle; it will remove the residue and restore towels' soaking power. In the future, avoid detergents with fabric softener when washing towels.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, July 2006
  6. Good Thing

    Keeping Lampshades Clean

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    Here's a bright idea: Keep your fabric lampshades dust-free with an adhesive lint roller. Hold the shade steady, and pass the roller over the exterior.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, November 2009
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas