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Paisley Scarf

Martha Stewart Living

 

In the mid-19th century, Paisley scarves were popular accessories for many well-dressed women, and they have never lost their appeal. Martha shows how to make one of these chic, short scarves with Paisley silk and cashmere.

Tools and Materials
Scissors
Rotary cutter
Paisley silk charmeuse, about 1/4 yard
Cotton batting
Cashmere
Rotary cutter
Disappearing-ink pen
Pins
Iron

Paisley Scarf How-To
1. Cut the silk into an 8-by-36-inch piece. Cut the cotton batting and cashmere to the same size. Lay the cashmere face up with the silk face down on top of it; lay the cotton batting over the silk. Pin all three fabrics together.

2. Sew around three sides with a 1/2-inch seam allowance, leaving one short end open. Clip corners with scissors or rotary cutter, and turn right-side out. Press seams flat; press in the open end's seam 1/2 inch.

3. From the sewed end of the scarf, use a disappearing ink pen to mark a 3-inch-long line, centered and about 5 inches in from the end. This will serve as the scarf's buttonhole. Using a tight zigzag stitch, sew along one side of the line. Once you reach the end, keeping the needle inserted in the fabric, lift the foot and turn the fabric. Starting your stitch so it overlaps the line you have just sewn, sew along the other side of the line. Overlap your stitches again at the end of the line.

4. Use a rotary cutter to cut down the center of the buttonhole to create the opening. Hand-sew the open end shut.

Resources
To purchase the Paisley silk charmeuse used in this craft, contact B & J Fabrics.

 

Comments (12)

  • Pianomomma 6 Dec, 2010

    I had been wanting to make these for some time, but couldn't afford (or find) silk charmeuse and/or cashmere, and also wanted to use washable fabrics. I have just finished my first (of about 12 scarves that I am making for holiday gifts) and used some lovely "simply silky" (polyester) prints and fine wale corduroy instead. I did not use batting, and the scarf turned out beautifully, with plenty of body and structure. What an elegant and easy project!

  • AnneJahnke 22 Sep, 2010

    It seems that the cashmere and silk would be stable and warm enough, is the batting necessary? Would it work well to just use a cotton flannel?

  • amyjodeb 22 Sep, 2010

    Where can I find cashmere??? If I can't find it, I'm going to use velvet instead that is light weight. I have almost the exact same fabric at home from a fabric shopping trip I took a few years ago! I have't had a project that seemed right until now!!! I can't wait to get home and start this!

  • JMM 22 Sep, 2010

    Put right sides of fabrics together.

  • alexlover 3 Nov, 2009

    can someone help me with this sentence, "Lay the cashmere face up with the silk face down on top of it; lay the cotton batting over the silk. "

  • ChanaSnyder 23 Sep, 2008

    Love this idea! It's a perfect way to use the beautiful cashmere sweaters that have ill-placed moth holes...

  • ChanaSnyder 23 Sep, 2008

    Love this idea! It's a perfect way to use the beautiful cashmere sweaters that have ill-placed moth holes...

  • buttonville 23 Sep, 2008

    I think for the drape factor, bamboo batting would be the best to use. The cotton they say to use would be alright also.

  • bittyro 23 Sep, 2008

    There is also cotton batting available at most craft and sewing retailers. Look for it in the quilting section. I've purchased packages sized for making a baby blankets that are perfect for crafting projects.

  • RoBarbara 22 Sep, 2008

    Diffenately not polyester, there is wool available, maybe even at a fabric store like Joanne's or a quilt store. RoBarbara

  • craftingheart 22 Sep, 2008

    I love this idea, thank you! What kind of batting would be the best to use?

  • citypixie 22 Sep, 2008

    This is great way to salvage a cashmere sweater that has a few holes!