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  1. Kitchen to Closet

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    A pair of paper-towel holders mounted on the inside of one closet door organizes scarves or ties and keeps them wrinkle-free. A kitchen-utensil rail proves to be ideal for belts: Each gets its own S hook.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Washing Bath Towels

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    For best results, launder bath towels every three to four days using the following guidelines:

    - Non-chlorine bleach can be used safely on white towels when they start to look a bit dingy, but avoid chlorine bleach, which eats up towels.

    - Do not use fabric softener, which actually stiffens towels.

    - Wash white towels on the hottest setting.

    - When drying towels, use one scent-free dryer sheet.

    Source
    The Martha Stewart Show, May 2007
  3. Safe and Warm

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    Wool scarves and mittens are ready to wear from one season to the next when wrapped in acid-free tissue paper and slipped into labeled craft boxes (available at organizing stores). The boxes are then stowed inside shallow drawers.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  4. Fill Planters with Packing Peanuts

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    Don't throw out the foam peanuts or bubble packing material the next time you get a box in the mail; put them to use. 

    When filling outdoor planters, sub the packing material for up to half the soil. The plant won't know the difference, the container will be lighter, and you'll use less soil. Place the packing material in a plastic bag at the bottom of the pot, and cover with the soil.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, June 2010
  5. A Better Stake

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    After pruning trees and shrubs in the yard, save the trimmed branches to support returning perennials, such as lilies. They'll be free and plentiful, not to mention more natural looking than metal or plastic spikes. Look for branches with lots of little twigs, and stake three to five of them around each plant. As the plant grows, its foliage will gradually wind around the network of twigs.

     

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, July 2006
  6. Good Thing

    Longer-Lasting Blooms

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    When using daffodils in mixed bouquets, place them in separate bud vases. The stems contain a poisonous sap that causes other flowers to wilt quickly.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2008
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas