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Choosing a Paint Color

The Martha Stewart Show, Episode 5128

Before selecting a paint color, ask yourself the following questions:

  • How will the paint hue relate to the color of your furniture and floors?
  • When will you be in the room most often?
  • At what time of day does each color you're considering look its best?
  • Is there anything outside your windows that may come into play, like a red brick wall or deciduous trees?

The same color may appear dramatically different even on adjacent walls. Once you've narrowed down your selection, test the colors by painting large 2-by-5-foot swatches on opposing walls. Or, paint large pieces of poster board, which are easy to move around the room, to see how your colors look in different light.

Flat paints hide surface imperfections, and are best for ceilings and low-traffic walls. Eggshell paint has a slight gloss and is relatively easy to clean, making it ideal for kids' rooms, family areas, and hallways. Semi-gloss will resist moisture and provide durable shine; use for bathrooms, kitchens, and moldings. High-gloss paints are the most lustrous finish; use for window frames, doors, cabinets, and furniture.

Learn more about Martha Stewart Living Paint.

Comments (2)

  • 20 Apr, 2010

    Why store paint cans upside down?

    1. Even a 'perfectly' sealed can of paint will form a skin due to the air already in the can. The skin will be on the 'bottom' and the fresh, usable paint will be on the top.
    2. All pigment in paint eventually sinks to the bottom, depending on how long the paint sits. Storing upside down allows the pigment to settle on the top, making it easier to incorporate the color back into the medium.

    Mrs. Lu Ann M.
    Two Rivers, WI

  • 20 Apr, 2010

    Why store paint cans upside down?

    1. Even a 'perfectly' sealed can of paint will form a skin due to the air already in the can. The skin will be on the 'bottom' and the fresh, usable paint will be on the top.
    2. All pigment in paint eventually sinks to the bottom, depending on how long the paint sits. Storing upside down allows the pigment to settle on the top, making it easier to incorporate the color back into the medium.

    Mrs. Lu Ann M.
    Two Rivers, WI