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  1. Adjust as Needed

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    These shelves are positioned to fit the closet's contents, with little wasted space in between. The two center shelves accommodate stacks of folded clothing. On top, a small shelf holds collapsible bags, while the lowest shelf is designated for laundry.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Double Stacked

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    Four divided trays, painted orange, become a layered jewelry organizer. Two trays lie flat along the drawer bottom. The remaining two, joined with wood glue, form the top shelf; it is elevated by strips of 1-inch square molding affixed to the inner sides of the drawer.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  3. Job Jar

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    In summer, the mere mention of chores can evoke reactions usually reserved for dentist appointments and haircuts. To make tasks less tedious for everyone, print them on strips of paper, color-coding to distinguish "grown-up jobs" from "kid jobs." On chore day, have everyone draw and complete a job.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Kids, Volume 1 2001
  4. Made for Hanging

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    Homemade hangers preserve the shape of tall boots and maximize space. They're created by replacing the knobs on cedar boot trees with large cup hooks, which are screwed into the tops. The trees and boots then hang from a cafe-curtain rod.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  5. Kitchen to Closet

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    A pair of paper-towel holders mounted on the inside of one closet door organizes scarves or ties and keeps them wrinkle-free. A kitchen-utensil rail proves to be ideal for belts: Each gets its own S hook.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  6. Pantry Dividers

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    Storing baking sheets, cutting boards, and sturdy platters upright on kitchen shelves frees space and keeps you from having to lift a heavy stack when you need only one item. Create dividers for them using tension curtain rods. Buy rods to fit the space, and position pairs of them at intervals. Twist to tighten.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, August 2006
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas