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Scratch-Free Skillets

Organizing Good Things 2004, Volume 2004 Special Issue 2004

Nesting pots and pans saves space in a cupboard, but you should take steps to prevent them from damaging one another. Preserve stainless-steel interiors by inserting large coffee filters between pans. Nonstick surfaces are protected just as well by soft paper towels. For seasoned cast-iron skillets, use coated paper plates, which won't soak up oil.

Comments (17)

  • timkat05 15 Nov, 2010

    To CaliDog: other than just wanting the surface to remain pretty/like new, The more scratches (i.e. scrubbing with steel wool/Brillo pads) Stainless has, the more food will stick and make for difficult cleanup. (and we all want to avoid that). ;o)

  • amysocrafty 15 Nov, 2010

    I use retired dish towels to protect my nonstick pans while stored. Works great, and no need to worry about size - just tuck them around the edges.

  • CaliDog 14 Nov, 2010

    I get why you'd want to protect the inside of a non-stick pan, but why a stainless steel pan? I've use scrubbies and Brillo pads on mine, and I've had them for over eight years. How bad am I harming them???

  • divinelana 14 Nov, 2010

    i use paper plates ... very durable and they come in assorted sizes; plastic plates work well too.

  • carlaj 14 Nov, 2010

    This is a great idea! I also use old cloth napkins - the ones that may be stained or no longer fit your decor. They're a good environmentaly friendly alternative.

  • camelotbytheriver 14 Nov, 2010

    I bought a roll of the rubberized shelf paper at the $ store and cut circles for my pot/pans. Works great in our Motorhome too.

  • SMILETU 22 Dec, 2008

    Thanks for the terrific ideas about protecting our good pans and skillets that are nonstick. I had come up yrs. ago with the idea of using the soft shelf paper as inserts for my new pans/skillets. ( Just cut circles to fit each item)
    I like the coffee filter idea and other ideas shared by all of you.
    Thanks as ever...Indiana friend.

  • SMILETU 22 Dec, 2008

    Thanks for the terrific ideas about protecting our good pans and skillets that are nonstick. I had come up yrs. ago with the idea of using the soft shelf paper as inserts for my new pans/skillets. ( Just cut circles to fit each item)
    I like the coffee filter idea and other ideas shared by all of you.
    Thanks as ever...Indiana friend.

  • lbuser 22 Dec, 2008

    I bought a huge pack of these filters at Costco and I was wondering what to do with the extra. I also use them at the bottom of planters to cover the holes. It lets the water drip out with out letting the soil drain away. These would also eliminate the clanking. This is a great idea.

  • pinkladychef 21 Dec, 2008

    Better yet, there is a product called Protect-A-Pan, which I saw on one of the HGTV shows featuring new kitchen products (www.protectapan.com). They are strechy cotton covers with an elastic fitting that goes around the pan or pot handle, and they won't shift around. A 3 pack is $19.99 plus shipping. They are definitely worth the investment!

  • cottagegarden 21 Dec, 2008

    Way to go Certainly Susan!! Green up Martha's great idea! You should take the title of the Green Martha!!

  • CertainlySusan 20 Dec, 2008

    Why not be ecological and when your cloth dinner napkins are too worn and stained to use anymore, tear clean napkins into quarters and use them? You won't have to replace them, you won't be using anything that stress the environment.

  • lovestennis 20 Dec, 2008

    Thanks, Martha, for the great idea! I hate to hear all the banging on my pans when I stack them. I'll get on the project soon. Happy Holidays!

  • Henrie 20 Dec, 2008

    I have been doing that with my china too, using either paper plates or cutting down the non-skid shelf liners. All my casseroles have paper towels cushioning them, my pie plates any kind of glass ware that you stack together needs to be protected.

  • Vigdis 20 Dec, 2008

    Good Idea :O) Have never tought of it... Thank you

  • pelican66 20 Dec, 2008

    lol i use cheap paper plates. little more solid than filters since i tend to bang pots into a stack :)

  • carolinedefran 20 Dec, 2008

    i use paper towels