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  1. Hollister House English Garden

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    Located stateside in the charming town of Washington, Connecticut, is a true gardening wonder: a quintessentially English garden.

    Hollister House Garden, named after the 1760 house around which it is built, was created by art and antiques dealer George Schoellkopf in the manner of such famous English landscapes as Sissinghurst and Great Dixter: formal in its structure, yet rather wild in its style of planting.

    Resources
    For more information, visit hollisterhousegarden.org.

    Source
    The Martha Stewart Show, May 2010
  2. Our Favorite Gardening Gear

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    After decades of weeding, wading, and planting, we dig these work shoes the most. 

    From top: breathable waterproof boots, sturdy clogs with removable foot beds, and all-purpose boots for cold weather. To protect hands, nothing beats Mud's nonslip, machine-washable gloves. 

    Hoser Classic Work Boots $95, muckbootcompany.com; Super-Birki Clogs $79, birki.us; Blundstone 500 $150, zappos.com; the original $6 per pair, by Mud, littlesgoodgloves.com

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, April 2010
  3. At a Glance

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    Windowed boxes (on the left) covered in tweed make it possible to find a specific sweater in an instant. Magnetic catch-and-pull tabs ensure that the lids close tightly.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  4. By A Thread

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    Sometimes the perfect thread for a sewing project comes on a spool that's imperfectly sized for your sewing machine. The solution: Place the spool in a heavy mug, and position it on your work surface directly underneath the spool pin. Take hold of the thread end, and hook it over the spool pin before threading it into the machine as usual (the thread should form a 90-degree angle); the thread will unravel smoothly as you work.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2008
  5. Rock-Lined Flower Bed

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    Window boxes filled with vibrant flowers are a welcome sign of spring. But when it rains, the soil in them often spatters, dirtying windows and sills. To prevent the muddy splashes, spread river stones (available at garden centers) in a layer over the tops of the flower beds. The stones will act as a barrier while keeping the soil moist for the blooming plants.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, April 2008
  6. More Home & Garden Ideas