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Art-Project Storage

Martha Stewart Kids, Volume 3 2002

Little artists can be so prolific, creating paintings, drawings, and collages faster than you can figure out what to do with them. Rather than letting the works of art that don't make it onto a refrigerator door gather dust in a closet, devise a system of displaying and storing them. One good solution is to label mailing tubes, available at office-supply stores, by semester or year, and fill with rolled-up stacks of artwork. Read on for more ideas.

Displaying Masterpieces
A collage of your child's best works will brighten up the area above your desk or a hallway or staircase. Spread a sheet of acid-free paper on the backing piece of a picture frame, and then arrange your favorite drawings or paintings in place, overlapping them slightly, until you find an arrangement you like. Affix the artwork in place with archival quality double-sided tape. Sandwich the paper and art between the backing piece and the glass, and then close the frame.

Paper Portfolio
A portfolio lets kids organize their art from the current school year and keeps it from getting damaged. To make the portfolio, cut a 40-by-32-inch mat board (available in art-supply stores) in half crosswise; bind the two pieces together on three sides using paper tape. For the label, write the name lightly in pencil, then affix self-adhesive label dots. The slim portfolio can easily be stored behind a dresser or sofa.

Comments (16)

  • gypsylee 1 Feb, 2011

    Pringle (chips) tubes can work too. Just make sure you wipe the inside part a bit so it won't stain the drawings with seasoning or grease! Your children can also participate in decorating the tube. Also, parents, a once in a while Pringle treat...n'est- ce pas?

  • gypsylee 1 Feb, 2011

    Pringle (chips) tubes can work too. Just make sure you wipe the inside part a bit so it won't stain the drawings with seasoning or grease! Your children can also participate in decorating the tube. Also, parents, a once in a while Pringle treat...n'est- ce pas?

  • veeanne 31 Jan, 2011

    If you don't have room to store tubes or portfolios or just want to see the artwork more often, you can take a picture of it and display. My daughter drew a self-portrait in first grade and my son drew his renditon of Van Gogh's "Starry Night" in third grade. I took pictures of the art, sized it to put the pictures in 2x3 clear plasic frames with magnets affixed to the back.
    My daughter and son are now 25 and 27 years old, I still have them on my fridge and those pictures still make me smil

  • Terripaints 9 Sep, 2010

    As a Chinese Brush painter I can vouch for storing rolled up paintings in tubes. All of us in our class do this. We buy plastic tubes from the art store and they protect our rice paper paintings from humidity and insects here in Florida. There are also some good sales on portfolios, from time to time, at local and on-line art supply stores.

  • Cheryllion 8 Sep, 2010

    I've been doing this for some time, too -- I store the rolls in a container specially made for wrapping paper rolls (Then make some that stand upright and some that slide under beds).

  • perelin 10 Jul, 2010

    That

  • 13th 21 Feb, 2009

    Could you please suggest manage way for architectual model project as well ?
    I've got so many but I don't want to leave it .. Please TT__TT

  • dougy 17 Sep, 2008

    This is great! I have three grandchildren and am always trying to find a place to store all the pictures they make me. I like all of these suggestions and am going to print this out for my daughter. Great Suggestions!!!

  • faith929luv 6 Sep, 2008

    Maybe use a poster frame available at craft stores?

  • frenchmom 29 Apr, 2008

    I am closer to grand children than young children now but will decorate the grand kids' rooms with one frame for each of my children, so their own children can admire what their parents did as they were young.

  • m_w 18 Apr, 2008

    If it matters to you, be careful about acidic cardboard tubes and board. Sometimes they (and plastic) can stain and deterioriate the art over time. I don't know much about all this, but it might be worthwhile to look for archival materials for storing precious things.

  • Valdemontc 22 Mar, 2008

    I normally use the plastic art tube buth the mailing tube is a great choice as it is cheaper, the mat board sometimes is expensive, you can apply the same by cutting 2 pieces of same size from any carboard box, before you dispose of the box.

  • ElenaA 19 Jan, 2008

    Wish I'd had this information when my kids were young. Brilliant ideas!

  • kellimaier 9 Jan, 2008

    I like the mailing tube idea for me and MY drawing assignments. I am more partial to the portfolio idea for kids. I used an artists portfolio but my class work is usually done on a large scale and doesn't fit well. It would work perfectly for the kid's artwork.

  • kellimaier 9 Jan, 2008

    I like the mailing tube idea for me and MY drawing assignments. I am more partial to the portfolio idea for kids. I used an artists portfolio but my class work is usually done on a large scale and doesn't fit well. It would work perfectly for the kid's artwork.

  • designerjulie 28 Dec, 2007

    A great way to display kids artwork is to use a wooden clothes drying rack (available at Target). Set it up in your child's room and then clothespin artwork to it. It is easy to add new work and take work away that has been proudly displayed for several weeks! My daughter loves hers. We also display award certificates on it for her activities.