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Project

Crocheted Snowflakes

One of nature's best decorating ideas is the snowflake: It adds sparkle to upturned eyelashes, embellishment to bare tree branches. With crocheted versions of this seasonal icon, you can bring its frosty filigree indoors.

Introduction

Crocheting a scarf or vest might take a month, but you can complete a simple flake in about an hour. Adorn your Christmas tree with these lacy beauties as the Victorians did, or use them in one of our projects, such as the snowflake garland or the frosty stockings. Add one to a gift bow, take a half dozen to a tree-trimming party, tie one to your sweater's zipper pull, or suspend a bunch from the ceiling to imitate a blizzard.

This pattern uses the single-crochet stitch in four rounds and calls for counting stitches. Starch and block your snowflakes before hanging so that they hold their shape. Then give the house a cheery dusting with your delicate creations. And if you're a beginner, review crocheting basics before you start.

Thin yarn and small hooks create airy, delicate snowflakes. U.S. sizes 5 to 8 hooks are good for novices. Experienced needleworkers may use threads to size 20 or 30 and hooks to U.S. size 13 or 14. Try making a few fuzzy flakes with mohair or angora; it's more difficult, but the result is dazzling. As you crochet, the emerging design may look floppy or askew, but starching and blocking will turn the piece into a symmetrical marvel.

Counting Stitches
As you follow the directions, the loop on the hook does not count as a stitch. The stitch just below it should be the first in your reckoning.

Key
sc = single crochet
sl st = slip stitch
ch = chain
rnd = round

Slip Stitch (sl st)
The sl st is used to join a stitch that was just worked with another one. Insert the hook into a stitch that you want to join with another; catch the yarn, and draw it through all the loops on the hook.

 

Materials

  • Size 10 crochet cotton
  • Crochet hook
  • Snowflake templateDownload the PDF
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Cardboard
  • Clear packing tape
  • Fabric stiffener
  • Bowl
  • Tweezers
  • Paper towels
  • Pins
  • Blocking board

Steps

  1. Step 1

    la99676_1202_starch.jpg

    Enlarge the snowflake template to 150 percent. Cut it out, then glue to a 6-inch square of cardboard. Cover cardboard with clear packing tape; set aside. Pour fabric stiffener (available at crafts stores) into a bowl. Soak snowflake in stiffener, 1 minute. Remove with tweezers; pat dry with paper towels. Pin tautly to blocking board, using lines as a guide. Let dry overnight; wiggle pins to remove.

  2. Step 2

    la99676_1202_flake1.jpg

    ch 12; join with sl st to form the foundation ring. Rnd 1: ch 2 (counts as first sc), 17 sc into ring, join with sl st. Rnd 2: ch 1, *sc in next sc, ch 16, skip next 2 sc.* Repeat from * to * 5 times more; join with sl st. Rnd 3: *sc in each of next 8 ch’s (through one loop only), ch 18, sl st in 12th ch from hook, ch 12, sl st in 13th ch from hook (same loop as before), ch 12, sl st in 13th ch from hook (same loop as before), ch 6, sc in each of next 8 ch’s (through one loop only), skip first sc of previous row.* Repeat from * to * 5 times more; join with sl st. Finish off; weave in ends.

  3. Step 3

    la99676_1202_flake2.jpg

    ch 8; join with sl st to form the foundation ring.Rnd 1: ch 2 (counts as first sc), 17 sc into ring, join with sl st.Rnd 2: ch 2 (counts as first sc), sc in each of next 2 sc, ch 2, *sc in each of next 3 sc, ch 2.* Repeat * to * 4 times more; join with sl st.Rnd 3: ch 2, turn over and work in the opposite direction, 2 sc into hole (made by 2 ch’s on last rnd), ch 3, *3 sc into next hole, ch 3.* Repeat * to * 4 times more; join with sl st. Rnd 4: ch 2 (counts as first sc), sc in each of next 2 sc, ch 6, sl st in 4th ch from hook, ch 2, *sc in each of next 3 sc, ch 6, sl st in 4th ch from hook, ch 2.* Repeat * to * 4 times more; join with sl st. Rnd 5: *sl st in next sc, ch 6, sl st in 7th stitch from hook (same loop as before), sl st in next sc, ch 16, sl st in 8th ch from hook, **ch 8, sl st in 8th ch from hook (same loop as before).** Repeat ** to ** 2 times more, ch 6, sl st in first sc of next group of 3 sc.* Repeat * to * 5 times more; join with sl st. Finish off; weave in ends.

  4. Step 4

    la99676_1202_flake3.jpg

    ch 6; join with sl st to form the foundation ring.Rnd 1: *ch 5, sl st in 4th ch from hook, ch 7, sl st in 6th ch from hook, ch 9, sl st in 8th ch from hook, ch 11, sl st in 10th ch from hook, ch 13, sl st in 12th ch from hook, ch 11, sl st in 10th ch from hook, ch 7, sl st in 6th ch from hook, ch 5, sl st in 4th ch from hook, ch 4, sl st in 3rd ch from hook, ch 9, sl st in 3rd ch from hook, ch 5, sl st in 4th ch from hook, ch 7, sl st in 6th ch from hook, ch 11, sl st in 10th ch from hook, ch 13, sl st in 12th ch from hook, ch 11, sl st in 10th ch from hook, ch 9, sl st in 8th ch from hook, ch 7, sl st in 6th ch from hook, ch 5, sl st in 4th ch from hook, ch 1, sc in ring.* Repeat from * to * 5 times more, join with sl st. Finish off; weave in ends.

  5. Step 5

    ch 6; join with sl st to form the foundation ring.Rnd 1: ch 2 (counts as first sc), 11 sc into ring; join with sl st.Rnd 2: sl st in first sc, *ch 5, sl st in 6th ch from hook (same loop as before), sl st in each of next 2 sc.* Repeat * to * 5 times.Rnd 3: sl st in each of next 3 ch's (of the 5 ch's of previous rnd) to the top of first loop, *ch 5, sl st in 3rd ch (top of loop).* Repeat * to * 5 times; join with sl st.Rnd 4: *ch 8, sl st in 9th ch from hook (same loop as before), ch 12, sl st in 10th ch from hook, ch 14, sl st in 12th ch from hook, **ch 12, sl st in 13th ch from hook (same loop as before).** Repeat ** to ** once, sl st in each of next 3 ch's (working toward center), ch 10, sl st in 11th ch from hook (same loop as before), sl st in each of next 3 ch's (working toward center), ch 8, sl st in 9th ch from hook (same loop as before), ch 6, sl st in 4th ch from hook, ch 2, skip 5 ch's of previous rnd, sl st in next stitch.* Repeat * to * 5 times; join with sl st. Finish off; weave in ends.

Source
Martha Stewart Living, Volume 109 December 2002

Reviews (15)

  • whipper75229 5 Dec, 2014

    I agree. The instructions are confusing. The individual photo is missing for the 4th snowflake. I can see it in the composite photo at the top, but the graphic artist that set this page up missed that.
    The "steps" are confusing. Four of the steps are actually the instructions for the individual snowflakes and should not have been called "steps".
    HOWEVER, I love the delicacy of the snowflakes. They are very pretty, and I am going to try to make them.
    Just wish someone would correct the article.

  • Marissa Burkett 17 Dec, 2013

    Loved the patterns but the whole thing made no sense. Why would we stiffen them in the first step? And step 5 - is that a 4th snowflake? If you want to label it as easy then you should be aware that there will be people trying to crochet snowflakes that aren't master crocheters, aka me. Once I figure out which "steps" were what then it was easier, and I did successfully make two snowflakes, but whomever wrote this should revisit logical progressions of steps... also, english.

  • lolosparkles 19 Jun, 2013

    These are beautiful! I want to make some but I can't see how to get to the pattern. Please, someone, help me!!

  • SusanaMc 20 Mar, 2009

    Again, printing is so light, directions cannot be read.

  • moeb100 17 Jan, 2009

    I have made some before , used stiffy glu and spinkled with irridence flakes, i hang them from window valances in winter here in fla

  • analou 17 Jan, 2009

    that last one should read Elmer's White Glue - sorry about that !!!!LOL

  • analou 17 Jan, 2009

    I have made many of these and they really are very simple - years ago we just used plain old starch to make them stiff. We used plastic wrap to lay them on and stretched them out to dry and they did overnight- several times I used Elers white Gue for the really large ones and it also worked...They are fun! and everyone loved them as gift decorations on their packages.

  • mfrances 17 Jan, 2009

    If you look closely you will see there are only the four snowflakes. The different sizes are achieved with different size crochet hooks and different thread.

  • cartersgrandmother 17 Jan, 2009

    Be sure to use stainless steel pins or you will get rust marks on the snowflake.
    cartersgrandmother

  • LindenBlossom 17 Jan, 2009

    I haven't done crochet since I was a child. I must give my crochet hooks a dust off and try these - they look fabulous!

  • g5cdmslf 17 Jan, 2009

    Love the four patterns. Where can I get patterns for the others shown?

  • bettyannescountrycottag 17 Jan, 2009

    I have made similair snowflakes for my family and if you don't have the stiffener, try either disolving sugar in warm water and dunking them in and the proceeding, or also milx some elmers glue with warm water. i have used both of these and they both work fine.

  • SuziT 26 Jul, 2008

    My grandmother who passed away before I was born used to make these! I have a few that she made and can't wait to try making my own!

  • madhelmeteer 10 Mar, 2008

    I love crochet and have my own shop for whimsical hats and sweaters. These snowflakes will surely help to spice up a plain hat. Thanks and visit my shop at www.madhelmeteer.etsy.com

  • kaeci 4 Mar, 2008

    I love crochet snowflakes. This one is really pretty. Thanks for publishing this pattern.