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  1. Web-Exclusive Video: Skeleton Step-by-Step

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    During a taping of "The Martha Stewart Show," makeup artist Charlie Green shows how to create a sinister skeleton look for Halloween, to be revealed at the end of the episode. Take a look.

    Resources
    Learn more about this episode, and get Charlie's Halloween makeup tips.

    Source
    The Martha Stewart Show, October 2010
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  2. Long-Term Care

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    Clothes and accessories stored for a season or longer need protection from light, moisture, and insects. A box filled with acid-free tissue paper, assorted cedar inserts, and dried lavender makes it easy to prepare items as you put them away.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  3. Adjust as Needed

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    These shelves are positioned to fit the closet's contents, with little wasted space in between. The two center shelves accommodate stacks of folded clothing. On top, a small shelf holds collapsible bags, while the lowest shelf is designated for laundry.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  4. Shelf Within a Shelf

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    Make the most of your cupboard real estate by adding another level of storage for glassware. Cut a piece of nonskid shelf liner (available at home-supply stores) to line a serving tray and a cupboard shelf; this will help glasses stay put and protect the rims. Place glasses used less frequently upside down on the shelf, set tray on top, and arrange everyday glasses upside down on tray.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, August 2006
  5. Support Staff

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    Tall-growing orchids need a little extra support to stay upright, but the stakes they lean on are usually an eyesore. For ones that won't detract from the beauty of the blooms, purchase precut 16- to 18-gauge floral-stem wire from a crafts store. Bend into a 90-degree angle 4 inches from the top. Curve the top portion to form a U. Plant the stake next to the orchid, and hook the U around the stem.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, February 2008
  6. Orchids: Out of the Vase, into the Strainer

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    Gutter strainers -- the wire cages that filter leaves and debris washed off the roof -- also make great orchid pots, providing the plants with excellent aeration and drainage. 

    Buy an inexpensive copper strainer at a hardware store. Using a pair of light pliers, bend the spindly legs of the strainer into decorative loops around the top (the loops also offer a way to hang the orchid if you like). Soak sphagnum moss (available at garden centers) in water, pack into the strainer, and then put in the orchid. Pack with more moss for a snug fit, and give it a hearty watering in the sink. Let the moss drain completely before placing the plant in a bowl.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, November 2008
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas