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  1. Surprising Garden Pots: Chimney Pots

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    These stately pedestals, made to fit over a chimney's flue, help prevent drafts and add a distinctive note to rooftops. Though pricey, they also make a grand spot to prop up plants. Choose antique or new pots -- find the latter at masonry yards -- and place a plastic pot liner inside each. (For fit, you may need to trim top of liner, then cut down the side and overlap edges.) We filled ours with purple cordylines, silver tradescantia, and rex begonia vine (Cissus discolor).

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    Martha Stewart Living, March 2006
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Carry and Wash

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    A pair of canvas bags -- one for laundry, the other for dry cleaning -- eliminates sorting later and makes for easy transport. Clear luggage tags on each indicate the appropriate cleaning method. You can also insert your contact information to streamline drop-offs at the cleaner.

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    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  3. A Better Stake

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    After pruning trees and shrubs in the yard, save the trimmed branches to support returning perennials, such as lilies. They'll be free and plentiful, not to mention more natural looking than metal or plastic spikes. Look for branches with lots of little twigs, and stake three to five of them around each plant. As the plant grows, its foliage will gradually wind around the network of twigs.

     

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, July 2006
  4. Stacked Flowerpots

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    Sometimes small houseplants get lost among larger ones. Elevating smaller plants increases their visibility. And placing your pots at different levels will add a new dimension to the display. Simply turn a few small flowerpots upside down, and stack plants in pots of the same size on top. Intermingle these plants with larger ones. Use pots of the same material -- terra-cotta, for example -- to create a uniform look. (Place plants on a waterproof tray or drain before setting them in the desired location, so water leakage won't damage your surfaces.)

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    Martha Stewart Living, February 2009
  5. Good Thing

    Keeping Lampshades Clean

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    Here's a bright idea: Keep your fabric lampshades dust-free with an adhesive lint roller. Hold the shade steady, and pass the roller over the exterior.

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    Martha Stewart Living, November 2009
  6. Plant-Care Markers

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    Return from vacation to find your plants thriving, not barely surviving. Create care instructions for your house sitters. Print a note for each plant (including watering guidelines). Then stick the instructions to wooden plant markers (or chopsticks). If you want to take the extra step of laminating, your notes -- and probably your plants -- will last a lot longer.

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    Martha Stewart Living, August 2010
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas