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Project

Leaf-Covered Candles

Introduction

Lemon, mountain laurel, and rhododendron leaves work well for this project.

Melt 4 to 6 ounces of beeswax in a double boiler. If you'd like, tint the wax: Add 1/4-inch pieces of crayon until you achieve desired shade. Note ratios so you can make more if needed. With a sponge brush, spread a few thin layers of wax on the back of a leaf. Press coated side of the leaf firmly onto a pillar candle. Working quickly but carefully, peel back the leaf, leaving a wax impression.

Source
Martha Stewart Living, November 2006

Reviews (18)

  • eljahb 1 Nov, 2011

    This is a beautiful way to add fall decor to a space. I love it so much I'm sharing it with my fans.
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/EljahB/163991400290778
    www.eljahb.etsy.com

    Thank you for always providing amazing ideas!

  • doneitall 10 Oct, 2011

    do you have to use beeswax or can you substitute parafin or candle wax

  • oceanasmom 8 Oct, 2010

    Hello,
    Can I used candles that are already made and just make the patterns?
    Thanks!

  • ee1 20 Nov, 2008

    Use leaves that are not dried.

  • amyd4 15 Oct, 2008

    Help! I tried to make these today and the wax wouldn't even stick to the candle! The only thing I did differently was try to use some of the dried leaves I already had. Do I have to use the leaves recommended?
    Help from anyone who's had success!
    thanks!

  • Anna_Marie 5 Oct, 2008

    These are really, really pretty....

  • lfr 4 Oct, 2008

    I've made lots of leaf and dried/pressed flower canldes. Just hold the leaf or flower in place and brush a thin layer of "Modge Podge" over it!

    Linda

  • Eode 4 Oct, 2008

    Can't wait to try this one! This is a nifty idea and a wonderful way to use up those crayon pieces I wasn't sure why I was saving.

  • LouLou2007 4 Oct, 2008

    Hi Andrea, you will be getting a leaf impression. The actual leaf does not stay on there and be very careful taking the leaf off. This project is well worth the trouble as the candles turn out so beautifully.

  • AndreaAndrea 4 Oct, 2008

    ooops! Sorry!

  • AndreaAndrea 4 Oct, 2008

    O.K., I'm an idiot. I don't understand. Am I just leaving a wax impressions? Or will the whole leaf be stuck to the candle? The picture looks as if there is quite a thick overlay. Please help.

  • AndreaAndrea 4 Oct, 2008

    O.K., I'm an idiot. I don't understand. Am I just leaving a wax impressions? Or will the whole leaf be stuck to the candle? The picture looks as if there is quite a thick overlay. Please help.

  • AndreaAndrea 4 Oct, 2008

    O.K., I'm an idiot. I don't understand. Am I just leaving a wax impressions? Or will the whole leaf be stuck to the candle? The picture looks as if there is quite a thick overlay. Please help.

  • gfbecker 4 Oct, 2008

    Any thick, sturdy leaf like the leaves she mentioned should work fine. You have a lot of those in Fla!

  • Osmondfan 4 Oct, 2008

    Does anyone know if all kinds of leaves will work? I live in Florida so I don't have the above mentioned leaves ? Any one ?????
    pinkgoals@yahoo.com

  • CraftTestDummies 24 Sep, 2008

    If you can't find beeswax, you can also use food-grade paraffin. It's usually available in grocery stores (used to seal jams and jellies) and can also be tinted with crayons. -Jenny at www.CraftTestDummies.com

  • AmeriDane 10 Sep, 2008

    This is beautiful! I hope to find some beeswax here in Denmark. Will of course have to figure out what it's called in Danish first, hehe! I love this idea!

  • carolyork 9 Nov, 2007

    What an excellent craft.I am so excited to be a part of Martha stewart's site Living in canada and not being overly computer literate you have made it easy for me to access herwonderful crafts and recipes. Martha' I love you You are an amazing lady.