No Thanks
Let
Keep In Touch With MarthaStewart.com

Sign up and we'll send inspiration straight to you.

Martha Stewart takes your privacy seriously. To learn more, please read our Privacy Policy.

  1. Medicine Cabinet Organizer

    Hide

    Make the most of a tight space with these easy tricks. Have galvanized metal cut to fit the back of the cabinet and inside the door. Adhere metal with caulk. (If your mirror has clips, loosen them, and slide the metal behind them.) Attach magnetized hooks, a notepad holder for brushes and combs, and spice canisters for hair elastics and barrettes. Group like items in votive holders and small acrylic boxes; double surface space with acrylic risers.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2006
    More Bright Ideas
  2. High Altitude

    Hide

    Hard-to-reach areas are a closet's no-man's-land. A spring-loaded pull-down rack, which you can install yourself, solves the problem. A light tug on a handle positioned in the center of the rod brings clothes to you.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  3. Kitchen to Closet

    Hide

    A pair of paper-towel holders mounted on the inside of one closet door organizes scarves or ties and keeps them wrinkle-free. A kitchen-utensil rail proves to be ideal for belts: Each gets its own S hook.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  4. Fill Planters with Packing Peanuts

    Hide

    Don't throw out the foam peanuts or bubble packing material the next time you get a box in the mail; put them to use. 

    When filling outdoor planters, sub the packing material for up to half the soil. The plant won't know the difference, the container will be lighter, and you'll use less soil. Place the packing material in a plastic bag at the bottom of the pot, and cover with the soil.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, June 2010
  5. Garden-Shed Crate Cabinets

    Hide

    Create custom cabinetry in your garden shed with vintage wine crates from flea markets or online auctions. Stack them horizontally and vertically, using some as bases to vary heights. Once you've established a layout, connect crates with wood screws and collars near the corners. Use cup hooks to hang smaller items, such as trowels, funnels, and scissors. If your need for storage grows, you can easily reconfigure the system.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2009
  6. Basic First-Aid Kit

    Hide

    When you need first-aid supplies most, you're usually not in the best frame of mind to search for them. A well-stocked first-aid kit keeps the items you need easy to find. Bandages, adhesive tape, gauze, and scissors are useful. To clean wounds, keep hydrogen peroxide or isopropyl alcohol (and cotton balls or swabs to apply it) on hand as well as antibiotic ointment (check expiration date). A first-aid kit is also a good place to store pain relievers.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2004
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas