Project

Potato-Print Baby Clothes

Sometimes, the most ordinary items can be used to create extraordinary results. By using some humble potato prints, you can create one-of-a-kind fashions that your kids will love.

Potato-Print Baby Clothes

Source: The Martha Stewart Show

Introduction

Resources

For permanent fabric paint, we used Setacolor -- Transparent by Pebeo.

materials

  • Potatoes (white potatoes, russets, or red potatoes)

  • Permanent fabric paint

  • Sharp knives

  • Foam brushes

  • Paintbrushes in various sizes

  • Cutting board

  • Forks

  • Vegetable peeler

  • Paper towels

  • Child-size hangers

  • Melon baller

  • Fine brushes

  • One-piece or prewashed T-shirts

  • Ironing board

  • Iron

steps

  1. Peel potato to create a smooth edge. To make the leaf, use a chef's knife to cut a large potato in half lengthwise.

  2. Use a paring knife to carve a tear-drop leaf shape out of other half.

  3. To create the ladybug body, carve a semicircle out of the other half for the body or cut a small red potato in half and in half again. For the head, use a melon ball scooper to cut out a circle for a round stamp.

  4. Place potato stamps on a paper towel to absorb excess moisture. Do this only the first time you use stamp.

  5. Apply paint to the flesh of the potato with a foam brush. You can use green for the leaf, red for the body atop the leaf, and black for the head.

  6. Slide a cutting board inside the shirt to block paint from bleeding through the back. Press the potato stamp firmly onto the shirt. Stick a fork in larger potatoes for stability when stamping.

  7. Draw a green stem with a detailing brush.

  8. Stamp another ladybug body and head atop stem.

  9. Draw black antennae with a detailing brush. Using the end of the brush, add small dots to the body and end of each antennae.

  10. Heat-set the shirt by ironing on the front with a hot iron after stamping. For a design with a lot of detail and "puffy" painted areas, iron the back as well.

  11. Peel a potato to create a smooth edge. Cut two large potatoes in half and use to make five potato stamps: a rectangle for the body, four green feet, tail shape, mouth, and a small triangle for spikes on the back. Place potato stamps on a paper towel to absorb excess moisture. Do this only the first time you use the stamp.

  12. Apply paint to the flesh of the potato with a foam brush.

  13. Slide a cutting board inside the shirt to block paint from bleeding through the back. Press the potato stamp firmly onto the shirt. Stick a fork in larger potatoes for stability when stamping.

  14. Dot black eyes with the back of the paint brush.

  15. Dot white teeth with the back of the paint brush.

  16. Heat-set the shirt by ironing on the front with a hot iron after stamping. For a design with a lot of detail and "puffy" painted areas, iron the back as well.

  17. Peel a potato to create a smooth edge. Create the leaf stamp: Cut the potato in half lengthwise and carve a teardrop shape in one half. Cut triangles in staggered shapes along both sides of the leaf shape.

  18. Create the carrot stamp: Cut the potato in half lengthwise, and carve a teardrop shape in one half. Cut triangles in staggered shape along both sides of leaf shape. Cut elongated shapes from the second half of the cut potato. Place potato stamps on a paper towel to absorb excess moisture. Do this only the first time you use the stamp.

  19. Apply paint to the flesh of the potato with a foam brush.

  20. Slide a cutting board inside the shirt to block the paint from bleeding through the back. Press the potato stamp firmly onto the shirt. Stick a fork in larger potatoes for stability when stamping.

  21. Heat-set the shirt by ironing on the front with a hot iron after stamping. For a design with a lot of detail and "puffy" painted areas, iron the back as well.

  22. Peel a potato to create a smooth edge. Create four potato stamps of simple shapes: a tail feather and three half-circles for the body, head, and wing. Place potato stamps on a paper towel to absorb excess moisture. Do this only the first time you use stamp.

  23. Apply paint to the flesh of the potato with a foam brush. Use a lighter color for the wing stamp to differentiate it from the body.

  24. Slide a cutting board inside the shirt to block the paint from bleeding through the back. Press the potato stamp firmly onto the shirt. Stick a fork in larger potatoes for stability when stamping.

  25. Use a detailing brush to create details on the beak.

  26. Heat set the shirts by ironing on the front with a hot iron after stamping. For a design with a lot of detail and "puffy" painted areas, iron the back as well.

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