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Project

Outdoor Lighting: Hanging Trees

Introduction

These conical Christmas trees are crafted from tomato cages. Here, they are hung from the boughs of an oak and illuminate the agave below, lending a touch of winter to an arid climate.

For more ideas and installation tips, see Nights All Aglow.

Materials

  • 3-tier round wire tomato cage
  • Black all-weather electrical tape
  • Monofilament
  • 100-bulb strands of green wire mini lights

Steps

  1. Step 1

    Bend cage's legs to form point; tape together.

  2. Step 2

    Starting at circle beneath point, tie lengths of monofilament halfway between vertical supports. Wrap monofilament once around middle circle, then tie to bottom circle.

  3. Step 3

    Tape prong end of light strand to point. Wrap strand around cage, spacing evenly and securing with tape as needed.

  4. Step 4

    To hang, attach a loop of monofilament.

Source
Martha Stewart Living, December 2007

Reviews (16)

  • 18 Dec, 2008

    I did something like this several years ago. They really look great. I bought some really CHEAP Christmas garlands, wrapped the cages and then added the lights. I wired the trees to large garden pots and used them by our front door. Now, I use them on our deck. Very festive!

    sisterschism

  • 18 Dec, 2008

    I did something like this several years ago. They really look great. I bought some really CHEAP Christmas garlands, wrapped the cages and then added the lights. I wired the trees to large garden pots and used them by our front door. Now, I use them on our deck. Very festive!

    sisterschism

  • 2 Dec, 2008

    I like this idea, but not so much for hanging. I'm going to use them next to my front door/drive way/patio.

  • 2 Dec, 2008

    I like this idea, but not so much for hanging. I'm going to use them next to my front door/drive way/patio.

  • 3 Nov, 2008

    It took me a second to figure out why, but my assumptions are that the mono filament running vertical between the top and bottom keeps the lights in a cone shape rather then pulling tight between the legs of the cage and becoming more pyramidal in shape.

  • 3 Nov, 2008

    It took me a second to figure out why, but my assumptions are that the mono filament running vertical between the top and bottom keeps the lights in a cone shape rather then pulling tight between the legs of the cage and becoming more pyramidal in shape.

  • 11 Dec, 2007

    I think this is a wonderful idea. I am going to make them, secure them in an attractive pot, decorated them like a Christmas tree, with garland, flowers and such and place them on either side of my door.

  • 11 Dec, 2007

    I think this is a wonderful idea. I am going to make them, secure them in an attractive pot, decorated them like a Christmas tree, with garland, flowers and such and place them on either side of my door.

  • 7 Dec, 2007

    why do you have to put the monofilament between the circles?

  • 7 Dec, 2007

    why do you have to put the monofilament between the circles?

  • 7 Dec, 2007

    I love love love this thanks so much for the idea!!!!!!!!!

  • 7 Dec, 2007

    I love love love this thanks so much for the idea!!!!!!!!!

  • 6 Dec, 2007

    clever

  • 6 Dec, 2007

    clever

  • 28 Nov, 2007

    I made some of these, but I used them on the ground and lined my driveway with them. They are great, I have the best light display so far in the subdivision.
    Judy

  • 28 Nov, 2007

    I made some of these, but I used them on the ground and lined my driveway with them. They are great, I have the best light display so far in the subdivision.
    Judy