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Project

No-Knit Textured Throw and Patterned Pillows

Created By: Johnny Miller

Introduction

It wouldn't be spin to describe this craft as ridiculously easy. Although in some ways that's exactly what you do with a Knitwit: spin (well, wrap) thread around a circular or square-shaped tool to create loopy rosettes. Rendered with luxurious yarns such as mohair, these florets look decidedly modern. 

To determine how much yarn you'll need per rosette, follow this rule of thumb: Winding once around the tool requires two yards, winding twice requires three yards, and so on. The Knitwit kit ($20, knitwit.com) comes with instructions, so we've limited the how-tos to our modifications.The basic technique involves wrapping the yarn and then twisting the tool's stem to release the floret with a satisfying pop. 

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Textured Throw
Add an artful touch to a plain throw using mohair-wool yarn to create florets, wrapping twice. Choose a blanket in a soft, complementary fabric. To attach the circlets, use the same type of yarn, stitching them onto the blanket at their centers.

Patterned Pillows
Clockwise from top: For this grid of daisies, wrap a creamy merino blend three times per rosette. To link the florets, attach them at their centers and edges using the same yarn. A trio of sable dots, made from alpaca wound twice, adorn a rectangle; to attach, follow the steps for adding rosettes to mittens. A burst of sunshine: Wrap a bright linen-mohair blend -- for this type of yarn, you'll need a half yard more per rosette -- three times around a square tool, which comes in the kit; to link the squares, follow the Knitwit instructions. Finally, attach along the pillow's edges.

Editor's Tip 
Creating these blossomlike designs calls for a different kind of holiday wrapping. Wind thread around a Knitwit, knotting at each loop with a needle. For thicker yarn, use a tapestry needle; for thinner, a sewing one. To alter the "pattern," play with thread type and the number of times it's wound around the tool.

More Knitwit How-Tos
No-Knit Floral Sweater Flourish
No-Knit Rosette Scarf
No-Knit Snuggly Hat and Mittens

Source
Martha Stewart Living, December 2009