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Project

Cold Frame How-To

Introduction

By building a cold frame, you can grow vegetables during the winter so you can feast on fresh produce from your backyard all year. It's not only delicious, but also environmentally friendly because it doesn't use any fossil fuel to get it on your table.



Materials

  • 36-inch 1-by-12 (use pine, cedar, or other inexpensive lumber)
  • 36-inch 1-by-8
  • Two 1-by-12s, cut 22 1/2 inches long
  • Two 36-inch 1-by-2s
  • Two 21-inch 1-by-2s
  • Two 24-inch pieces 7/8-inch lattice
  • Two 24-inch pieces 1 1/2-inch lattice
  • Two small wood scraps
  • Glass (or plexiglass) 22 by 34 inches
  • Wood glue
  • 1 1/2-inch wood screws
  • 1 inch finish nails or brads
  • Jigsaw
  • Drill
  • Hinges (optional)

Steps

  1. Step 1

    Make Cold Frame Box: Using jigsaw, cut the two shorter 1-by-12s diagonally lengthwise, from 12 to 8 inches.

  2. Step 2

    Glue the wider ends to the 36-inch 1-by-12.

  3. Step 3

    Drive screws through the 36-inch 1-by-12 into the ends of the slant-cut sides. At least two per side.

  4. Step 4

    Similarly, attach the 36-inch 1-by-8 to the narrow ends of slant-cut sides (finished box should be 24 by 36 inches).

  5. Step 5

    Turn box over.

  6. Step 6

    Make Cold Frame Lid: Lay 1-by-2 out flat to form a 24-by-36-inch rectangle.

  7. Step 7

    Glue and screw 36-inch pieces to 24-inch pieces; predrill holes to avoid splitting wood.

  8. Step 8

    Glue 7/8-inch lattice to 1 1/2-inch lattice, lengthwise along an edge. Repeat.

  9. Step 9

    Glue the assembled lattice pieces along the outer edges of the 24-inch sides.

  10. Step 10

    Secure with finishing nails to create slot for glass.

  11. Step 11

    Slide glass into place.

  12. Step 12

    Glue and nail wood scrap along edge of frame to hold glass in place. We used scrap pieces of 7/8-inch lattice.

  13. Step 13

    Place lid on box. Lid may or may not be attached with hinges.

Source
The Martha Stewart Show, November 2007

Tags

Reviews (6)

  • melissahiland 12 Nov, 2007

    what kind of vegtables did martha say can survive in the cold?

  • RobTurner 7 Nov, 2007

    WIth countersunk pilot holes he screws would be much less likely to split the wood (they should be centered 3/8" from the edge) and would clamp the glue joint as it dries. Slipshod instructions like these seem to be the norm in your publications. Martha, your readers deserve better!

  • woodyandpeg 7 Nov, 2007

    I'd like you to add a recommended glass type for the top, to avoid breakage

  • RobTurner 7 Nov, 2007

    While the basic idea is great, the sketchy instructions and sloppy techniques described would result in frustration for a novice who tried to make a cold frame by following them, and the end result would be crude at best.

    For instance, we are told (in rather oblique language) to glue the back to the ends of the sides, and then screw them together. It would be far better if holes for the screws were drilled and countersunk in the back first. (to be continued)

  • RobTurner 7 Nov, 2007

    While the basic idea is great, the sketchy instructions and sloppy techniques described would result in frustration for a novice who tried to make a cold frame by following them, and the end result would be crude at best.

    For instance, we are told (in rather oblique language) to glue the back to the ends of the sides, and then screw them together. It would be far better if holes for the screws were drilled and countersunk in the back first. (to be continued)

  • RobTurner 7 Nov, 2007

    While the basic idea is great, the sketchy instructions and sloppy techniques described would result in frustration for a novice who tried to make a cold frame by following them, and the end result would be crude at best.

    For instance, we are told (in rather oblique language) to glue the back to the ends of the sides, and then screw them together. It would be far better if holes for the screws were drilled and countersunk in the back first. (to be continued)