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Paper Christmas Tree

This project is simple enough for children and can result in an entire Yuletide forest for the mantle or dining table.
Martha Stewart Living Television

 

This project is simple enough for children and can result in an entire Yuletide forest for the mantle or dining table.

Tools and Materials

Paper tree ornament template
Scissors
Decorative green wrapping paper
Construction paper, in 18-by-12-inch sheets
Double-sided adhesive
Card stock
Pencil
Ruler
Roller cutter
Stapler
Staple remover
Bone folder

Paper Christmas Tree How-To

1. Cut a piece of wrapping paper to the same size as the construction paper. Cut several 18-by-1/4-inch strips of Twin-Tack. Remove the backing from one side of the Twin-Tack double-sided adhesive and carefully place it on the horizontal edges of the construction paper.

2. Download and print the template on heavy card stock. Trace the template onto the construction paper side and cut out the cone for the tree. Remove the backing from a strip of Twin-Tack and, with the decorative side of the tree facing up, adhere the Twin-Tack to the edge of the tabbed side. With the decorative side facing out, create a cone. Remove the protective backing and attach one side to the other.

3. The needles of the tree will be a strip of fringed paper. Using the same piece of two-sided paper, cut two strips: an 18-by-2 1/2-inch strip and an 18-by-1 1/2-inch strip. With the decorative side facing up, place the strips side by side. Beginning at one end of the wider strip, use a straight edge and a roller cutter to cut the strip so it slopes down to 1 1/2 inches wide to match the other strip. Beginning at one end of the thinner strip, use the same straight edge and roller cutter to cut the strip so it slopes down to 3/4 inch wide.

4. Remove the backing from a strip of Twin-Tack. With the decorative side facing up, adhere the strip to the nonsloped edge. Use a bone folder to score the paper along the strip of Twin-Tack. Fold the long strip into quarters so the non-sloped side matches perfectly, and staple together to keep the folds in place. Using sharp scissors, cut 1/4-inch-wide fringe along the entire length of the paper, each just stopping at the Twin-Tack.

5. Take out the staples with the staple remover and unfold the strip. With the construction paper side facing up, fold the strip along the scored edge. Using the wide end of the fringe strip and starting at the bottom of the cone, remove a section of the protective backing and stick the fringe onto the edge of the cone. Continue to spiral the fringe around the cone leaving about an inch of space between each tier of fringe. With the tree flat on the table gently push down and adjust the fringes to make them look neat and tidy.

Resources

The wrapping paper we used in this segment can be found at katespaperie.com.

 

Comments (5)

  • Love2Shop 13 Dec, 2010

    Any thoughts on how many trees would be needed to be used as centerpieces for an 18 ft. rectangular table?

  • KatharinaD 23 Dec, 2009

    You can find the ready made cardboard cones at:
    http://www.germanplaza.com/productcart/pc/viewCategories.asp?idCategory=284
    Beat the hassle of getting stiff cardboard to stay in place while the glue is setting. These cones do not have the seam of a home made one either.

  • JBJon1000 19 Dec, 2008

    Double Tack Mounting Film is the same as Twin Tack

  • JBJon1000 19 Dec, 2008

    Double Tack Mounting Film is the same as Twin Tack

  • MrsBic 3 Dec, 2008

    Have web searched art stores and only find Grafix double film.
    Who sells Twin Tack?