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Project

Apple Prints

Introduction

Crafts enthusiasts have long known that a potato can be cut in half, carved into a stamp, and used to decorate everything from cards to cloth. Another idea is to use an apple and allow its natural shape to be the dominant decorative motif. Simply cut the apple in half from top to bottom, press the flesh side against a paper towel to absorb any excess moisture, and cover that side using an ink pad in the color of your choice. You can use this apple on bags, cards, book covers, or virtually any surface of your choice. Be sure to hold the apple down firmly and apply equal pressure to the top and sides. Reapply ink after each application. Once the image has dried, you can use a paint marker to add a stem and leaf.

If you want a thicker image, you can brush fabric paint onto the surface of the apple. Set the paint by allowing it to dry, placing a press cloth over the image, and using an iron set on medium.

Source
Martha Stewart Living Television

Reviews (12)

  • Jordazzy 13 Oct, 2008

    I get my canvas bags at Michael's craft stores. They're in the section with the fabric paint. I think I'm gonna make these for my kids teachers and fill with goodies for Christmas.

  • crivy 8 Oct, 2008

    Where can I purchase plain canvas tote bags to print on with apples/veggies?

  • crazysheepgirl 3 Oct, 2008

    Apples look cute cut horizontal too. It makes a star in the center.

  • missem 30 Sep, 2008

    You can use all sorts of veggies for this, too. Globe artichokes are particualrly stunning, pears make a nice contrast to the apples, carrots a fun polka-dot. . . the list is as endless as your garden!

  • missem 30 Sep, 2008

    You can use all sorts of veggies for this, too. Globe artichokes are particualrly stunning, pears make a nice contrast to the apples, carrots a fun polka-dot. . . the list is as endless as your garden!

  • thequirkygirl 30 Sep, 2008

    india ink (available in various colours) make great impressions and is also very, very permanent...so be careful - whatever the ink gets on, it will be on from now until the end of time! fern fronds also work beautifully utilizing this technique. just use a rolling pin, or brayer to apply the ink to the fern fronds. leaves can be used also (use fresh leaves - not dry ones...)!

  • flidhais 30 Sep, 2008

    I've made hand painted t-shirts using artist's acrylic paint that comes in tubes.
    It stands up to washing after washing. And since it comes in tubes you can mix your own colors. To keep the paint moist while you work mist it with plain water and an old spray bottle. Old styrofoam trays work well to mix on.

  • pinkcloud 30 Sep, 2008

    You can use an ink called Staz-On. It comes in a variety colors and is just wonderful. You can even use it on glass.

  • nemommy 30 Sep, 2008

    You can buy waterproof ink in all sorts of colors. Just make sure the ink pad says waterproof. One brand is "archival Ink." It is usually $4.99 per pad. I'm not so sure about stamping food on my good ink pads though so I think I'd rather use fabric paint. I think I'll stamp a single apple onto a tote and fill it with goodies for a housewarming party I'm goinig to in late October.

  • deebeee 30 Sep, 2008

    I'm a bit confused about using an ink pad. It would limit the colors I could use. Is there another way - say just mixing some paint on a flat surface and pressing the apple half onto that. Probably would need to test it on scrap paper to see how to do this so as not to get globby results. Any ideas re this?

  • magicmomma 30 Sep, 2008

    Fabric ink is washable

  • ashleyarsenic 30 Sep, 2008

    i wonder if there is a special type of ink pad you're supposed to use. obviously if it's on a tote bag, it'll need to be washed eventually.