A Glossary of Sausages

Martha Stewart Living, July 2006

Spicy Cajun-style sausage of smoked pork, traditionally made in only three parishes in Louisiana. A staple of gumbo.

Pork sausage with nutmeg and clove. In Italy, it is used in bollito misto, a boiled-meats dish, and is served with lentils on New Year's Eve; the lentils symbolize money; the cotechino, abundance.

Originally from Frankfurt, Germany -- now, the all-American hot dog. The sausage can be all-beef or a mix of beef and pork. Frankfurters are lightly smoked and parboiled before they are packaged and sold in full or cocktail sizes.

Pork sausage with fennel seeds and garlic. Hot sausages are spiced with paprika and red pepper; sweet ones aren't.

Polish sausage made of pork, sometimes with beef or veal, and seasoned with garlic. In Poland, kielbasa refers to a wide range of sausages, some traditionally smoked over juniper wood.

German smoked pork-and-beef sausage flavored with garlic and usually served with sauerkraut.

Spicy North African sausage of lamb, beef, or a combination. Colored dark red by hot pepper and paprika.

Small pork sausage from southern France flavored with garlic and wine. A classic ingredient of cassoulet.

Mild German sausage made of veal, cream, and eggs -- ingredients that give the wurst its pale appearance and its name (which means white sausage).


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