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Granny Squares

Martha Stewart Living, November 2000

 

At their most beautiful, squares are subtle repeating designs in an overall pattern. Here, small squares of a single color are stitched together. Angora fibers soften and disguise the squares, leaving the emphasis on texture, and close stitches create a denser fabric. Use a small hook and good-quality angora. Each square works up quickly, making this a rewarding project for beginners.

To begin, ch6, then join last ch to first ch with sl st to form the foundation ring (see Abbreviations).

Round One
Working into ring, ch3, 2dc, ch2. Then, * work (3dc, ch2) into ring.* Repeat from * to * twice more. Join last stitch to beginning of round with a sl st into top of first ch3. (You will have 4 clusters in all when you have completed the round.) Turn your work over (traditional granny squares are not turned, but we liked the cleaner effect; turn after each round or our pattern will not work). If you stop between rounds, it's a good idea to leave your work right side up.

Round Two
Starting where you ended on Round One, sl st into the space created by the ch2 in the previous row. (There will be a gap there, which will make the space easy for you to find.) Work (ch3, 2dc, ch2, 3dc) into this space. * Skip to the next gap, and work (3dc, ch2, 3dc) into that space.* Repeat from * to * twice more. Join last stitch to beginning of round with a sl st into top of first ch3. (You will have 8 clusters in all.) Turn your work over.

Round Three
Starting where you ended on Round Two, sl st into space created by ch2 in previous row. Ch3, 2dc into this space. * Skip to next gap; work (3dc, ch2, 3dc) into this space, then skip to next gap and work 3dc into that space.* Repeat from * to * twice more. Skip to next gap; work (3dc, ch2, 3dc) into remaining space. Join last stitch to beginning of round with a sl st into top of first ch3. (You will have 12 clusters in all.) Turn your work over.

Round Four 
Starting where you ended on Round Three, sl st into gap created by ch2 in previous row. (Ch3, 2dc) into this space. * Skip to next gap; work (3dc, ch2, 3dc) into that space, then skip to next gap; work 3dc into that space, then skip to the next gap; work 3dc.* Repeat from * to * twice more. Skip to next gap; work (3dc, ch2, 3dc). Finally, skip to next gap; work 3dc. Join last stitch to beginning of round with a sl st into top of first ch3. (You will have 16 clusters in all.) Stop here. After completing last round, snip yarn, leaving a little extra; make a sl st and pull end of yarn through loop; pull to tighten. Weave in outer loose end of yarn; trim loose end at center. (For larger square, turn work over and add more rounds, increasing number of clusters per side as you go and turning work over after each round.)

Return to Granny Squares

 

Comments (8)

  • 15 Feb, 2011

    The size hook used determines the size of the granny square. So use different size hooks and then decide which size square you like best.

  • 24 Feb, 2009

    I would love to know what size crochet hook was used for this project. It only states to use a small hook.

  • 3 May, 2008

    I love to crochet it one of the things my grandmother and aunts taught me,you can make so many wounderful things for the holidays or any season,

  • 2 Apr, 2008

    Thanks for such wonderful ideas. I never thought of using anything but knitting worsted to make Granny Squares. Now I can make small items out of any kind of thread or light weight yarn and a smaller hook. I am really intrigued by the bookmark idea. Loved the scarf from angora wool, too. The portability of this kind of craft makes it ideal for travel.

  • 28 Mar, 2008

    FINALLY! A well-written, easy to understand set of instructions for crocheting granny squares. Thanks, Martha!

  • 24 Jan, 2008

    Been making Granny Squared since 1974- never saw such lovely squares - really never thought of a book mark. Now I have many new ideas to try thank you Martha and talented staff!

  • 24 Jan, 2008

    Been making Granny Squared since 1974- never saw such lovely squares - really never thought of a book mark. Now I have many new ideas to try thank you Martha and talented staff!

  • 18 Jan, 2008

    My mother-in-law just sent me some of these five-point "squares" as you describe made into little stockings for the tree. It looks like you start as described above, but instead of 4 clusters around the initial ringed chain you make 5, and work out from there for a total of 3 "rounds," then fold over and stitch together.