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Project

Salad Table

Introduction

Wouldn't you love to eat home-grown salads? Growing your own food locally and organically not only provides you with healthier food -- it tastes better. 

Here's a great idea for growing fresh, flavorful salad greens right at your backdoor: a salad table -- basically, a shallow wooden frame with a mesh bottom. Plus, with legs attached, it allows you to grow great salad greens at waist level from April through November.

To build a salad table that's 33 inches wide by 58 inches long, you will need the following tools and materials:

 

 

Materials

  • Untreated framing lumber: two 10-foot-long two-by-fours and two 12-foot-long two-by-fours
  • 2 1/2-inch galvanized deck screws
  • 3/8-inch staples
  • 1 pound of 1-inch roofing nails
  • 3-by-5-foot roll of aluminum window screening
  • 3-by-5-foot roll of 1/2-inch mesh hardware cloth (galvanized wire mesh; comes in a roll)
  • Handsaw
  • Hammer
  • Tape measure
  • Square
  • Tin snips
  • Staple gun
  • Drill

Steps

  1. Step 1

    Make the frame by taking two 58-inch two-by-fours and attaching them to two 30-inch two-by-fours with galvanized screws. The two interior cross pieces are attached 18 3/4-inches from each end of the long piece, making three equal sections.

  2. Step 2

    Staple window screen on the outside bottom of the frame.

  3. Step 3

    Center the hardware cloth over the window screen; pull it taut and staple to the frame bottom.

  4. Step 4

    Nail roofing nails around the frame for added support.

Source
The Martha Stewart Show, March 2009

Reviews (32)

  • 10 May, 2013

    maybe melissahirsch shouldn't be listening to a group called "DEATH cab for cutie" if she's a stay at home mom.oakley sunglasses sale
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  • 1 Jul, 2012

    We made this salad table this year and have already cut 3 Walmart bags full of lettuce! We let the residents in our care home plant/water them and they loved watching them grow, grow, grow! Easy for them to water them. No bending over for them. They all loved it! Awesome plan Martha and friends!!! :)

  • 13 Aug, 2010

    Our salad table was a great success! Read my review on the Philadelphia Healthy Food Examiner page. http://www.examiner.com/examiner/x-63312-Philadelphia-Healthy-Food-Exami...

  • 13 Jul, 2010

    What a great idea!! We just built two of them. It's our first year growing in the Mid-Atlantic and was trying desperately to figure out how to grow lettuce, second time around, in this heat!! :)

  • 25 Mar, 2010

    I made this last summer and It turned out great. I used lag bolts to attach the legs. They seemed sturdier when we moved it. I didn't see the link to the Univ of Maryland, so I just measured from distance from the floor to my waist and had the boards cut that long! Then when I screwed the large casters on, it was the perfect height. I do like the idea of the table resting on a second board, so this spring, I'll take the legs off and add another board for stability.

  • 5 Mar, 2010

    This was a great project for my husband and I to do together. It took very little time and we recycled wood that we had in the yard. Thanks

  • 5 Mar, 2010

    This was a great project for my husband and I to do together. It took very little time and we recycled wood that we had in the yard. Thanks

  • 31 Mar, 2009

    I built the salad table in a few hours. total cost was $38. Be sure to put at least 2" wheels on the bottom so you can move it around. Also, I painted mine forest green to protect the wood from the water and moisture. Otherwise it will rot and fall apart in 2 seasons or less.

  • 31 Mar, 2009

    I built the salad table in a few hours. total cost was $38. Be sure to put at least 2" wheels on the bottom so you can move it around. Also, I painted mine forest green to protect the wood from the water and moisture. Otherwise it will rot and fall apart in 2 seasons or less.

  • 31 Mar, 2009

    I built the salad table in a few hours. total cost was $38. Be sure to put at least 2" wheels on the bottom so you can move it around. Also, I painted mine forest green to protect the wood from the water and moisture. Otherwise it will rot and fall apart in 2 seasons or less.

  • 30 Mar, 2009

    The instructions are much better on University of Maryland's site. http://www.hgic.umd.edu/content/documents/HG601SaladTables_SaladBoxes.pdf . Can't wait to try this out.

  • 30 Mar, 2009

    The instructions are much better on University of Maryland's site. http://www.hgic.umd.edu/content/documents/HG601SaladTables_SaladBoxes.pdf . Can't wait to try this out.

  • 30 Mar, 2009

    My husband

  • 29 Mar, 2009

    I've been waiting for a picture to show my husband what I wanted to build. Thanks to "spaceetracee" s comment and info I was able to go directly to University of Maryland's website and download what I needed. As of Sunday at 7pm your website did not have video or pictures only instructions. My husband does better with a picture. Plan on making this over next weekend. I've already purchased the different letture and spinach seeds I want to plant. Thanks again "spaceetracee".

  • 29 Mar, 2009

    I really don't want a table with legs on the lawn since i"ll have to mow around the legs. My thought is to utilize heavy rope in place of the legs and hang the table from several branches of our large tree. Main concern is will they get enough sunlight--how much do 'salad' vegetables need? What do you think?

  • 28 Mar, 2009

    If you click on "Home and garden information Center" above it takes you to a site for a very detailed instruction on building this table. I can't wait to try this myself.

  • 28 Mar, 2009

    I don't see where the directions for the table refer to the legs. Is the wood needed for the legs included in the 2x4's listed above? Help!

  • 28 Mar, 2009

    can this be made deeper for other vegetables? if so how? email me at dizz3898@aol.com
    thanks

  • 28 Mar, 2009

    I just signed on as I saw this last evening I have the general idea. Are the 2x4 quantities enough to make the legs of the table no instructions are given thank you so it is a great idea.

  • 27 Mar, 2009

    I have been growing Salad Greens for 3 winters in our greenhouse using plastic Gutters with drain holes punched in bottom hanging up with jackchain. I plant a Gutter every month so I dont run out of lettuce, by the time the third one is planted the first is almost ready to replant. It is to hot here in AZ to grow Lettuce in the Summer.

  • 27 Mar, 2009

    made two of these yesterday and used 2X6 and chick wire cause it was free and for extra strength I put 1x2 over top of the wire edge for extra strength and they turned out great can't wait for the first harvest. Thanks

  • 27 Mar, 2009

    made two of these yesterday and used 2X6 and chick wire cause it was free and for extra strength I put 1x2 over top of the wire edge for extra strength and they turned out great can't wait for the first harvest. Thanks

  • 27 Mar, 2009

    made two of these yesterday and used 2X6 and chick wire cause it was free and for extra strength I put 1x2 over top of the wire edge for extra strength and they turned out great can't wait for the first harvest. Thanks

  • 27 Mar, 2009

    made two of these yesterday and used 2X6 and chick wire cause it was free and for extra strength I put 1x2 over top of the wire edge for extra strength and they turned out great can't wait for the first harvest. Thanks

  • 27 Mar, 2009

    made two of these yesterday and used 2X6 and chick wire cause it was free and for extra strength I put 1x2 over top of the wire edge for extra strength and they turned out great can't wait for the first harvest. Thanks

  • 26 Mar, 2009

    A link to more detailed instructions are on the University of Maryland's website.
    http://www.hgic.umd.edu/

  • 26 Mar, 2009

    The legs are two boards of different lengths simply screwed or nailed together.
    I thinks she means, Its the first ORGANIC garden.

  • 26 Mar, 2009

    The legs are two boards of different lengths simply screwed or nailed together.
    I thinks she means, Its the first ORGANIC garden.

  • 26 Mar, 2009

    You need to include instructions for cutting the lumber into the appropriate lengths, and for assembling the legs. Not all of us are experienced woodworkers.

  • 26 Mar, 2009

    You need to include instructions for cutting the lumber into the appropriate lengths, and for assembling the legs. Not all of us are experienced woodworkers.

  • 26 Mar, 2009

    I watched the show today and I seem to have heard Martha say that this is the first garden to ever be planted at the White House. However, I'm sure it must have been a glitch, since I'm sure she must know that Eleanor Roosevelt planted a Victory Garden on the front lawn of the White House during WWII in 1943.

    I love this plan for a standing lettuce garden, making it much easier for elders who have a more difficult time bending over for prolonged periods of time. I

  • 26 Mar, 2009

    You forgot to include instructions for making the table legs and attaching the casters. Please include or email me.

    Thank you