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Making Halloween Masks

Martha Stewart Living, October 1997

Making your own Halloween costume is fun, but it can be time-consuming. This year, why not make a mask? Preserved leaves, flower petals, and feathers can be used to create masks that have the impact of a complete costume; they're playful enough for any trick-or-treater yet elegant enough for a Halloween ball. Preserved Leaves, Flower Petals, and Feathers can be used to create masks that have the impact of a complete costume; they're playful enough for any trick-or-treater yet elegant enough for a Halloween ball.

The masks featured here, some of our favorites, are all made using one simple technique. Basic, unadorned masks come in several shapes and sizes and can be found at costume and novelty shops; everything else you'll need is available at florist's and crafts stores. For some truly exquisite embellishments, try a milliner's-supply store -- or even your own backyard. Here we've used (above, from top to bottom): preserved maple leaves, preserved red-oak leaves, preserved lemon leaves, and dried hydrangea petals. The masks shown below were made using (from left): fabric rose petals, feathers, and vintage paper flower petals.