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Project

Silk-Dyed Easter Eggs

Give your Easter eggs a one-of-a-kind look with this simple silk-dyeing technique.

Materials

  • Large or extra-large raw eggs
  • Glass or enamel pot
  • Scissors
  • Pieces and scraps of 100 percent silk -- including cut-up silk ties, blouses, or boxers -- large enough to cover an egg
  • Squares of undyed cotton or pieces of old white sheets, pillowcases, or tablecloths that are large enough to cover silk-wrapped eggs
  • 3 tablespoons white vinegar
  • Twist ties
  • Warm water
  • Tongs or spoon
  • Cooling rack
  • Vegetable oil
  • Paper towels

Steps

  1. Step 1

    Cut silk into pieces large enough to wrap around a raw egg.

  2. Step 2

    Tightly wrap a raw egg with a piece of silk, making sure the printed side of the material is facing the egg. Secure with a twist tie.

  3. Step 3

    Place the silk-wrapped egg in a piece of undyed cotton and secure tightly with another twist-tie.

  4. Step 4

    Place egg(s) in an enamel or glass pot. Fill the pot with enough water to cover eggs completely. Add three tablespoons of white vinegar to the water.

  5. Step 5

    Bring water to a boil, turn heat down, and simmer for 40 minutes or longer.

  6. Step 6

    Remove eggs from water with tongs or spoon, place on a cooling rack, and let cool.

  7. Step 7

    Remove silk from cooled egg.

  8. Step 8

    For shiny eggs, wipe with a paper towel dabbed in vegetable oil.

Source
The Martha Stewart Show, April 2009

Reviews (21)

  • MPAustin 21 Apr, 2011

    Can you do the same thing with blown eggs?

  • daisydoodledandy 18 Jun, 2010

    Can you use the silk scarves more than once?

  • gcsmith 5 Apr, 2010

    What about eating the eggs? Is the commercial dye harmful to humans?

  • gcsmith 3 Apr, 2010

    oops, we wrapped eggs, not gees!1 ha ha ha

  • gcsmith 3 Apr, 2010

    We tried this using a stainless steel pot and it made no difference. We wrapped our gees in the silk than with aluminum fioil (dull side in). This really shouldn't have worked, so we were suprised when it did. The eggs were absolutely beautiful! The foil was easier for the kids too.

  • esther414 29 Mar, 2010

    oops i mean as long at it is silk ribbon. lol

  • esther414 29 Mar, 2010

    wonder if you can use the wide wire ribbon as well..i guess as long as it is ribbon.

  • Tiffany_Sun 29 Mar, 2010

    Hi Basky - we do not recommend eating the eggs.

    Groovyg - blown eggs can be used for this project, but they need to be filled with water so they don't float.

  • groovyg 28 Mar, 2010

    Can you do this with blown out eggs so you can keep them????

  • Basky 28 Mar, 2010

    Are these eggs edible after being done this way?

  • shimmysister 28 Mar, 2010

    This is so cool!!! I had a bunch of old ties from another project and tried it on a few eggs. I will be doing all my eggs this way. Some may not have been super bright, but the patterns were terrific. I will be stocking up on silk ties from garage sales this summer for next year!!!

  • derekandcassie 22 Mar, 2010

    This worked for most of the silks we tried, though a small, high-contrast print worked best (more abstract prints were not as stunning, but also transferred well).
    We blew-out some of the eggs before wrapping. It was challenging to keep them immersed, but they turned out well, too. Perhaps covering them with a steamer basket would remedy this.
    Cotton absorbs dyes readily. Wrapping the eggs very tightly should keep the dye from smearing on the egg, providing a clean transfer.

  • derekandcassie 22 Mar, 2010

    This worked for most of the silks we tried, though a small, high-contrast print worked best (more abstract prints were not as stunning, but also transferred well).
    We blew-out some of the eggs before wrapping. It was challenging to keep them immersed, but they turned out well, too. Perhaps covering them with a steamer basket would remedy this.
    Cotton absorbs dyes readily. Wrapping the eggs very tightly should keep the dye from smearing on the egg, providing a clean transfer.

  • derekandcassie 22 Mar, 2010

    This worked for most of the silks we tried, though a small, high-contrast print worked best (more abstract prints were not as stunning, but also transferred well).
    We blew-out some of the eggs before wrapping. It was challenging to keep them immersed, but they turned out well, too. Perhaps covering them with a steamer basket would remedy this.
    Cotton absorbs dyes readily. Wrapping the eggs very tightly should keep the dye from smearing on the egg, providing a clean transfer.

  • Semilove 6 Mar, 2010

    Yes, they are safe to eat, but boiling for 40 minutes, these eggs won't be tasty!

  • Semilove 6 Mar, 2010

    Yes, they are safe to eat, but boiling for 40 minutes, these eggs won't be tasty!

  • ronaa 25 Jul, 2009

    HI MY NAME IS RONIT AND FOR ME ALSO THIS DID NOT WORK FOR ME CAN I GET HELP?

  • ronaa 25 Jul, 2009

    HI THIS DID NOT WORK FORME AND PLEASE I NEED HELP

  • ladybugkids 24 Apr, 2009

    This did not work for me...I used some slik ties and the colors all ran together including the cotton. what went wrong ?

  • veber 13 Apr, 2009

    Are these eggs safe to eat after dying them with fabric dye?

  • duhanne 9 Apr, 2009

    Hi, I just loved the effect of these eggs. I wonder, do these keep if boiled for 40 minutes or should they be blown out??? Please advise