No Thanks
Let

Keep In Touch With MarthaStewart.com

Sign up and we'll send inspiration straight to you.

Martha Stewart takes your privacy seriously. To learn more, please read our Privacy Policy.

Project

Moth-Eaten Curtains

Materials

  • Cotton curtains
  • Pot of tea
  • Spray bottle
  • Clothesline
  • Scissors

Steps

  1. Step 1

    First, make a basic curtain out of thin cotton: Measure your window, adding 2 inches to the height. Cut fabric to measurements; fold over top 2 inches and sew to create a curtain-rod sleeve.

  2. Step 2

    ml010pp16_1000_curtain_ht1.jpg

    Twist a section of the fabric tightly, and hold in one hand. With the other hand, use scissors (preferably slightly dull) to take tiny snips out of the balled-up fabric (be sure not to cut the sleeve or your hand). Repeat this over different sections until the entire curtain has uneven snips, slashes, and holes; cut chunks and slices out for variation.

  3. Step 3

    Next, wash and dry the curtain, removing it from the drier before completely dry. The curtain will be knotted up, so this is a good time to make more tears and slices if desired.

  4. Step 4

    Brew a strong pot of tea (four tea bags per 2 cups of water) and when cool, pour into a spray bottle.

  5. Step 5

    ml010pp17_1000_curtain_ht2.jpg

    Flatten out the curtain, and clip to a clothesline; spray tea at top so it drips down, giving the curtain an eerily neglected appearance, as if the rod has rusted and stained the curtain.

Source
Martha Stewart Living, October Fall 2000

Reviews (11)

  • 11 Oct, 2010

    I used cheesecloth, as well, soaked in a bowl of strong coffee. When dry, I made some starter holes and ragged edges with scissors and then pulled and stretched the fabric for a random mess. Cheesecloth is light, so I am able to hang it with double sided tape inside my window edges.

  • 11 Oct, 2010

    I used cheesecloth, as well, soaked in a bowl of strong coffee. When dry, I made some starter holes and ragged edges with scissors and then pulled and stretched the fabric for a random mess. Cheesecloth is light, so I am able to hang it with double sided tape inside my window edges.

  • 11 Oct, 2010

    I used cheesecloth, as well, soaked in a bowl of strong coffee. When dry, I made some starter holes and ragged edges with scissors and then pulled and stretched the fabric for a random mess. Cheesecloth is light, so I am able to hang it with double sided tape inside my window edges.

  • 24 Feb, 2009

    I LOVE THIS IDEA

  • 9 Oct, 2008

    When I did this, I became a little frustrated with the "prefect-ness" of the snips I was making. To remedy this, I took my scissors (I have the kind that can separate in half) and stabbed at the fabric to create ripped holes.

  • 24 Sep, 2008

    I am going to try this with cheesecloth, but do I still need to wash and dry it? I am thinking not, but figured I would check.

  • 11 Sep, 2008

    Thanks for the ideas. Ive just bought some cheesecloth, so Ill give this a try...

  • 30 Aug, 2008

    I have also added red dye to make it even scarier. The cheescloth with red handprints can sell for up to $20 where I live.

  • 25 Aug, 2008

    I have used cheesecloth and coffee as opposed to the materials listed here and it comes out beautifully.

  • 24 Aug, 2008

    Cheesecloth is fantastic for this, I use strong instant coffee instead of tea.

  • 24 Aug, 2008

    Could this work somehow with cheesecloth?