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Project

Branch Arrangements with Daffodils

Inspired by the transition of the seasons, these displays pair the last bare branches of winter with freshly opened spring daffodils or flowering quince blossoms. The arrangement is also influenced by ikebana, a Japanese form of flower arranging that embraces asymmetry, unusual containers, and empty space.

Introduction

Dormant branches of any kind can be interlaced with the daffodils. Refresh the finished arrangement as needed, replacing any wilted flowers with fresh blossoms. Zinc containers are available from florists and garden stores.

Daffodil Arrangement How-To
1. Fill a rectangular zinc container with tepid water.

2. Assemble the branches inside, interspersing taller and shorter ones to create a varied texture.

3. Trim the daffodil stems so the flowers reach halfway between the top of the vessel and the tallest branches.

4. Insert each daffodil into the arrangement carefully, using the branches to support the stem. If using an array of daffodils, vary the placement according to hue and bloom size.

5. Keep the display away from direct heat and sunlight, and change the water once a week.

Quince Arrangement How-To
The container for this arrangement is a basic basket; with a coat of frost-gray paint, it becomes an elegant cache pot for branches of quince and pussy willows. Replace the quince with other flowering branches as needed. The pussy willows will last longer and can be used in several successive arrangements.

1. Dab floral adhesive on the bottom of a narrow glass vessel, and secure it inside a wide glass vessel. Fill both with tepid water, and place them inside a basket.

2. Group taller pussy willows and quince branches together; set them within the narrow vessel.

3. Arrange shorter-stemmed pussy willows and quince branches in the wide vessel, letting them lean outward slightly.

4. Keep the display away from direct heat and sunlight, and change the water once a week.

Steps

  1. Step 1

    Fill a rectangular zinc container with tepid water.

  2. Step 2

    Assemble the branches inside, interspersing taller and shorter ones to create a varied texture.

  3. Step 3

    Trim the daffodil stems so the flowers reach halfway between the top of the vessel and the tallest branches.

  4. Step 4

    Insert each daffodil into the arrangement carefully, using the branches to support the stem. If using an array of daffodils, vary the placement according to hue and bloom size.

  5. Step 5

    Keep the display away from direct heat and sunlight, and change the water once a week.

  6. Step 6

    The container for this arrangement is a basic basket; with a coat of frost-gray paint, it becomes an elegant cache pot for branches of quince and pussy willows. Replace the quince with other flowering branches as needed. The pussy willows will last longer and can be used in several successive arrangements.

  7. Step 7

    Dab floral adhesive on the bottom of a narrow glass vessel, and secure it inside a wide glass vessel. Fill both with tepid water, and place them inside a basket.

  8. Step 8

    Group taller pussy willows and quince branches together; set them within the narrow vessel.

  9. Step 9

    Arrange shorter-stemmed pussy willows and quince branches in the wide vessel, letting them lean outward slightly. Keep the display away from direct heat and sunlight, and change the water once a week.

Source
Martha Stewart Living, March 2008

Reviews (5)

  • moanymoany 13 Feb, 2009

    In February at the Floating Flower Market in Amsterdam people buy yard long 'sticks' that blossom in water as well as [filtered word] willow. The bunches of flowers are made up with lovely greenery and are not expensive. The Netherlanders really love their flowers.

    I'm expecting 40 stems of scented narcissi from the Isles of Scilly next week and I am going to put them with twigs like this.

  • Jan4kids 27 Jul, 2008

    I really love daffodils. They grew year after year in our front yard in Connecticut. Here in the tropics, daffodils can't survive the intense heat. Someone, please, give me an idea of where I might buy some artificial ones. I've looked and looked in so many different stores here, including those that specialize in beautiful artifiial plants and flowers...but...no daffodils. Help! If there is somewhere I can order them from...I would really appreciate your help. Thanks.

  • grandmaellie 7 Mar, 2008

    Branch arrangements are perfect for our carefree Florida condo living style! Martha always has thre very best ideas for decorating, and they are so very appreciated!

  • Bonnie2chefs 7 Mar, 2008

    Forcing branches every Spring is something my family has always done,as we live in the countryand have [filtered word] willows,Cherry, Plum,

  • beanewyorkerin2ndlife 20 Feb, 2008

    I love branch arrangements, because they can be changed with a few differant
    touches throughout several seasons, particurlarly [filtered word] willows.