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  1. Self-Contained

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    Open storage cubes, available at organizing stores, rein in piles of folded shirts and sweaters and keep them from toppling over. The movable cubbies also provide support for the stacks on either side.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
    More Bright Ideas
  2. In Plain Sight

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    Open, pull-out shelves provide an orderly home for men's or other flat footwear. Each shelf is deep enough to accommodate two rows of shoes, so no stand-alone racks are needed.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  3. Washing Bath Towels

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    For best results, launder bath towels every three to four days using the following guidelines:

    - Non-chlorine bleach can be used safely on white towels when they start to look a bit dingy, but avoid chlorine bleach, which eats up towels.

    - Do not use fabric softener, which actually stiffens towels.

    - Wash white towels on the hottest setting.

    - When drying towels, use one scent-free dryer sheet.

    Source
    The Martha Stewart Show, May 2007
  4. Good Thing

    Supply-Securing Cord

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    Use bungee cords to keep items from tumbling off freestanding shelves. The cords are especially helpful in high-traffic areas, such as the garage, where shelves might get jostled. Hook a cord across the front of a shelf, or use an extra-long one to wrap around the sides as well. If the cord isn't taut, wrap slack around the leg, then hook the cord to itself.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, August 2006
  5. DIY Fabric Refreshers

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    DIY
    If your upholstery has an unpleasant odor, fluff it up and air it out, or have it professionally cleaned (ask for a "chemical-free" treatment).

    Tips
    Before allowing pets on your furniture, cover it with towels. Change and wash the towels frequently.

    Source
    Healthy Home 2008, Spring 2008
  6. Basic First-Aid Kit

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    When you need first-aid supplies most, you're usually not in the best frame of mind to search for them. A well-stocked first-aid kit keeps the items you need easy to find. Bandages, adhesive tape, gauze, and scissors are useful. To clean wounds, keep hydrogen peroxide or isopropyl alcohol (and cotton balls or swabs to apply it) on hand as well as antibiotic ointment (check expiration date). A first-aid kit is also a good place to store pain relievers.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2004
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas