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  1. Hollister House English Garden

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    Located stateside in the charming town of Washington, Connecticut, is a true gardening wonder: a quintessentially English garden.

    Hollister House Garden, named after the 1760 house around which it is built, was created by art and antiques dealer George Schoellkopf in the manner of such famous English landscapes as Sissinghurst and Great Dixter: formal in its structure, yet rather wild in its style of planting.

    Source
    The Martha Stewart Show, May 2010
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  2. Come to Light

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    Here's an illuminating way to point guests to the party: Put your house number in lights. Download our number templates, print, and cut out. Trace each digit onto the side of a cardboard gift box. Using a craft knife, cut out numbers. Tape vellum to interior of cut sides. Set boxes outside, placing a battery-operated push light inside each to illuminate the digits.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2007
  3. Wallpapered Shelves

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    Add a splash of personality to a lackluster work space by covering plain floating bookshelves with wallpaper. Measure the shelf, and cut the wallpaper slightly longer than shelf and wide enough to wrap around it with an overlap. Use wallpaper paste to affix the wallpaper to the shelf, pasting one side at a time. Cut slits into excess paper at ends, forming flaps; fold down, and affix with paste. Let dry completely, and hang shelves as usual.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, February 2008
  4. Hiding Supplies

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    Keep laundry supplies tidy and out of sight with built-in shelves and a curtain that can be pulled across them when the laundry is done. Mothballs and cedar chips are stored in canning jars, and little bars of soap are kept in airtight containers. Towels for drying hand-washables are stacked on one shelf. Special stain remedies are kept together in a galvanized metal box; detergent is in a large plastic container with a scoop for easy measuring.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2004
  5. Orchids: Out of the Vase, into the Strainer

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    Gutter strainers -- the wire cages that filter leaves and debris washed off the roof -- also make great orchid pots, providing the plants with excellent aeration and drainage. 

    Buy an inexpensive copper strainer at a hardware store. Using a pair of light pliers, bend the spindly legs of the strainer into decorative loops around the top (the loops also offer a way to hang the orchid if you like). Soak sphagnum moss (available at garden centers) in water, pack into the strainer, and then put in the orchid. Pack with more moss for a snug fit, and give it a hearty watering in the sink. Let the moss drain completely before placing the plant in a bowl.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, November 2008
  6. Basic First-Aid Kit

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    When you need first-aid supplies most, you're usually not in the best frame of mind to search for them. A well-stocked first-aid kit keeps the items you need easy to find. Bandages, adhesive tape, gauze, and scissors are useful. To clean wounds, keep hydrogen peroxide or isopropyl alcohol (and cotton balls or swabs to apply it) on hand as well as antibiotic ointment (check expiration date). A first-aid kit is also a good place to store pain relievers.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2004
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