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Project

Sponge Ball

Great for a game of tag on a scorching hot day, squishy sponge balls are summer's alternative to snowballs. 

Introduction

Made from kitchen sponges that are cut up and tied together, they last longer than water balloons and are softer and splashier than regular balls. Best of all, after tossing them around, the kids will be as clean as the kitchen dishes.

Tip: Use new sponges, and be sure not to wet them ahead of time; they are easier to cut straight out of the package.

Materials

  • Three 1/2-by-2 3/4-by-4 1/4-inch sponges
  • Pen
  • Ruler
  • Scissors
  • String

Steps

  1. Step 1

    With a pen and a ruler, make five lines lengthwise on a sponge, each 1/2 inch apart.

  2. Step 2

    Use scissors to cut the sponge, using the lines as a guide, into six rods. Repeat with the other two sponges.

  3. Step 3

    Lay strips on top of each other in three layers, five to six to a layer. Cinch them across the middle with a piece of string; knot it tightly. Fluff pieces out into a ball.

Source
Martha Stewart Kids, Volume 8 2003

Reviews (11)

  • 14 Jan, 2013

    Where do you find the colored sponges?

  • 9 Jul, 2012

    IMade these with two of my grandchildren. What a hoot! We laughed a lot as we worked. The making was the fun for me. Next day in 100* heat they played and played.

  • 29 Jun, 2012

    I highly recommend using a bread knife and a cutting board to cut these. I started with scissors and they took far longer. I also found thicker spongers at the dollar store -- it's all they had -- so the bread knife easily cut the thick sponge into two narrow sponges before I made the "fries". If you use string, don't worry too much if it's not tight enough the first time. Simply turn the ball over and make a second tie over the first -- it will be easier to get it tighter.

  • 29 Jun, 2012

    I highly recommend using a bread knife and a cutting board to cut these. I started with scissors and they took far longer. I also found thicker spongers at the dollar store -- it's all they had -- so the bread knife easily cut the thick sponge into two narrow sponges before I made the "fries". If you use string, don't worry too much if it's not tight enough the first time. Simply turn the ball over and make a second tie over the first -- it will be easier to get it tighter.

  • 6 Jun, 2012

    To AliCali: Have you tried looking at a dollar store? They usually have the cheap, really bright, dry sponges. I usually find mine there.

  • 3 Jun, 2012

    Ok just made these! much easier with rubber bands instead of tying it off. i made 46 of them.

  • 28 Jan, 2011

    I'm having a lot of trouble finding dry sponges. I used to see them in the grocery store all the time, but I can now only find the kind that are soaked in some time of anti-bacterial liquid. I'd also like some different colors. Do you think I could possibly dye them?

  • 12 Aug, 2010

    wow this is so cool! I'm going to have a water fight with these with my friends! This is such a great idea! :)

  • 12 Aug, 2010

    Wow! This is such a great idea! I'm going to have a water fight on a hot day with my friends with these! :D

  • 22 Sep, 2008

    This is definiately going to be something I suggest to my son's school for their end of school "field day" party!! Much easier than filling balloons and such!! GREAT IDEA!

  • 23 Jul, 2008

    These are absolutely the best waterballoon alternative. I made these for 80 children on a really hot day. It's a bit time intensive to make so many, but the alternative was to fill about 320 waterballoons so that each kid could get 4 balloons. This was a better option. Fill a few large buckets of water and let the kids at it, afterwards they can take home a fun party favor to wash their parents' cars. Another huge plus is that you won't have to pick up the little bits of ballon afterwards!