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  1. Botanical Door Border

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    Dusty miller, known for its velvety foliage, is small enough to be pressed in a telephone book. When dried, the leaf fronts turn silvery white, while the backs go gray. Both are on view in figure-eight garlands, which flank a doorway in the style of architectural moldings. 

    The leaves are affixed to plum-colored rice paper and laid under glass in inexpensive clip frames.

    See More Plant-Pressing How-Tos

    How To Build a Plant Press

    Sources
    Clip Frames (23 1/2" by 9 3/4" ), from ikea.com

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, April 2010
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Double Stacked

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    Four divided trays, painted orange, become a layered jewelry organizer. Two trays lie flat along the drawer bottom. The remaining two, joined with wood glue, form the top shelf; it is elevated by strips of 1-inch square molding affixed to the inner sides of the drawer.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  3. Self-Contained

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    Open storage cubes, available at organizing stores, rein in piles of folded shirts and sweaters and keep them from toppling over. The movable cubbies also provide support for the stacks on either side.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  4. In Plain Sight

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    Open, pull-out shelves provide an orderly home for men's or other flat footwear. Each shelf is deep enough to accommodate two rows of shoes, so no stand-alone racks are needed.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  5. Towel Tune-Up

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    Are your towels holding less water than they used to? It may be that your choice of washing detergent contains fabric softener, which has residues that cling to individual fibers, rendering towels less absorbent. The next time you clean a load, add a cup of distilled white vinegar to the rinse cycle; it will remove the residue and restore towels' soaking power. In the future, avoid detergents with fabric softener when washing towels.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, July 2006
  6. Towel Cabinet

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    A wooden flea-market cupboard makes a great towel cabinet, left. Use top of cabinet for extra storage. Keep your regular supply in the glass-fronted cabinet. Having all towels visible makes it easy to keep track of your inventory. Open shelves on the sides hold glass jars full of cotton balls and soaps.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2004
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas