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Project

Pocket Scarf

Introduction

A muffler with sewn-up compartments offers all kinds of possibilities. Objects can be stockpiled, cleverly hidden, or simply toted along, like the dog on the left, for a very warm ride.

This is an easy project that older kids can do with adult supervision; all that's needed is pins, yarn, and a needle. Work with a scarf that's long and wide enough to accommodate the size pockets that kids would like.

 

Materials

  • Pins
  • Yarn
  • Needle
  • Scarf

Steps

  1. Step 1

    Kids should decide whether they want two pockets or three, and if they want them to be equal widths or not. Fold one end of the scarf up to the desired depth.

  2. Step 2

    Pin the sides, and then pin the middle to correspond to the desired widths; you can use a ruler to make sure the pins are in a straight row, or follow the rib of the scarf itself.

  3. Step 3

    Make a running stitch with a darning needle and yarn through both layers, using the pins as a guide. Reinforce top of seam with a cross stitch or a double stitch and tie off, hiding the ends inside.

Source
Martha Stewart Kids, Volume 6 2002

Reviews (13)

  • eventsbyevelyn 8 Nov, 2011

    what material are you suggesting. I only saw the one comment and they used fleece. Is that the best material for this project? The pockets, are they 6 or 9 inch deep? Hard to judge.

  • crafty1958 11 Oct, 2011

    Made with Love: Crafting for a Cause (check it out at http://www.hillcrestcf.org/crafting/) is doing a fleece scarf project for foster children, so I happen to have kids' scarf dimensions: Finished length for a child's scarf should be about 45-50" (adult scarves are 60" minimum length). As for width, it greatly depends on how thick the material is. For thicker material, where only one thickness is necessary for warmth, 6-7" is sufficient; for thinner material, make the scarf wider. Good luck!

  • craftylady31 16 Feb, 2011

    Is there a pattern ? I have lots of fleese and would like to make some.

  • bottabing 18 Jan, 2009

    Are there any measurements one would suggest if I were to make it from fleece yardage? I have no small children, but would love to make some for my niece and nephew. Thanks.

  • Mamma21 13 Jan, 2009

    Perfect for the youngest of our new sewers 4yrs up boys and girls alike, I have them all. Yes the pockets can hold those mittens and hats. For those of you in the not so cold country try making them out of terry or broadcloth with pockets on both ends for all kinds of treasures; great for the beach and the lake or a nature hike.

  • naveisa 13 Jan, 2009

    I love all of Martha's ideas however the winter ideas need to have a little variety because not all of are freezing our tooshies off in the North some of us are roasting down in south Texas for instance. But I still need craft ideas!!!

  • Ky-Ann 13 Jan, 2009

    I've seen this done on each end of the scarf and then a hand warmer put in to each. A great way to keep little hands warm here in Wyoming!

  • artsterr64 13 Jan, 2009

    This was the BEST gift my 14yo BEGINNING sewer made last year. She cut narrow fleece scarves, cut fringe into each scarf end and sewed a small iPod sized pocket onto one of the scarf ends. An added bonus- she zigzaged her friends initials onto the pockets before sewing them onto the scarves. Easy and SO cute - her high school friends loved them. Guys and girls both.

  • Booschmoop 13 Jan, 2009

    If the pockets are made sturdy enough I could use this to carry my mp3 player, lipbalm etc. on winter walks.

  • pelican66 13 Jan, 2009

    if the pockets were deep enough i wonder if a child's gloves and hat could be kept there when the coat is hung up?

  • raggedyanne1849 10 Mar, 2008

    Very easy and stylish for my 8 year old granddaughter, Jurney. We used polar fleece to make ours.

  • mrspsp 15 Nov, 2007

    Wonderful idea for a child to carry a couple of small water bottles on a class trip to the zoo. The child can take responsibility for making it herself too.

  • JDK 12 Nov, 2007

    Cute! and with leftover yarn, can be made with stripes