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  1. Sliding Storage

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    Normally used in kitchens, a pull-out pantry becomes a shoe closet when the shelves are installed at an angle; professional assistance is recommended for this project. Nonskid shelf liners prevent pairs from sliding when the unit moves.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Put Reminders by the Door

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    Eliminate stray notes and pieces of paper by writing important to-do tasks on an erasable board near the door. Adding a painted wooden picture frame upgrades the standard message board; below it, a "hot box" -- a mesh bin set off by a colorful painted square -- helps you remember cameras, cell phones, and any other small equipment you may need to take with you.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2003
  3. A Tall Story

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    Paperwhites are a favorite for the season -- until they grow too tall and flop to one side. To rein them in, root the bulbs in gravel with a solution of 1 part rubbing alcohol and 10 parts water. They'll stop growing at about two-thirds their usual height.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, December 2007
  4. Towel Tune-Up

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    Are your towels holding less water than they used to? It may be that your choice of washing detergent contains fabric softener, which has residues that cling to individual fibers, rendering towels less absorbent. The next time you clean a load, add a cup of distilled white vinegar to the rinse cycle; it will remove the residue and restore towels' soaking power. In the future, avoid detergents with fabric softener when washing towels.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, July 2006
  5. Orchids: Out of the Vase, into the Strainer

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    Gutter strainers -- the wire cages that filter leaves and debris washed off the roof -- also make great orchid pots, providing the plants with excellent aeration and drainage. 

    Buy an inexpensive copper strainer at a hardware store. Using a pair of light pliers, bend the spindly legs of the strainer into decorative loops around the top (the loops also offer a way to hang the orchid if you like). Soak sphagnum moss (available at garden centers) in water, pack into the strainer, and then put in the orchid. Pack with more moss for a snug fit, and give it a hearty watering in the sink. Let the moss drain completely before placing the plant in a bowl.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, November 2008
  6. More Home & Garden Ideas