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  1. A Year of Flowers: January

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    Sweet fragrances and sunrise colors fill this vase with bright promise for the New Year. Kumquats and limes evoke a tropical getaway, as do lush blossoms of phalaenopsis orchids (available at many supermarkets). The perfumes of paperwhite narcissus and jasmine are a surefire pick-me-up. As you make the arrangement, insert the sturdy citrus branches before adding the delicate flower stems. For a final touch, let some jasmine trail down the side.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living
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  2. A Year of Flowers: June

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    At this time of year, it's tempting to create an everything-in-the-vase display that rivals perennial borders at their June peak. But indoors, simpler can be better. Consider combining just a couple of fine specimens: the amazing varieties of one flower, such as alliums, and the gorgeous foliage of another, such as hosta. We used a fluted white vase to focus attention on subtle color harmonies and contrasting silhouettes. On a practical note, alliums need frequent water changes, so refill the vase daily.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living
  3. Seder Table Settings

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    In addition to displaying the main seder plate, incorporate some of the symbolic foods of Passover into individual place settings. (Carafes of wine can double as place-card holders.) With everything in reach, guests will have what they need during the reading of the Haggadah, keeping the passing of the seder plate -- and the risk of spills at the table -- to a minimum.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, April 2009
  4. Fall Arrangement: Pear "Welcome" Display

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    Here's a fresh idea for the season's abundant Forelles and Anjous: Use them to make a friendly, fragrant greeting.

    Line up seven pears (in the same color or a mix) on a mantel. Then, with a fine-tipped washable marker, write letters on the front of each pear. Press whole cloves into the flesh along the lines; using a pushpin or a tack first can ease their entry. Make the letters no earlier than the day your guests arrive -- the sweet and spicy aroma will be as welcoming as the message itself.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, November 2010
  5. Good Thing

    Taming of the Shoe

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    Brides-to-be have a new reason to kick up their heels. Known for her winsomely feminine dresses and shoes, New York City-based designer Lela Rose has found a way to make her high-end creations more accessible: She's launching a line of wedding heels and flats with Payless. The beribboned pumps, kitten heels, and other classic incarnations will be sold for $45 to $50; most of them can be dyed at no additional cost in one of 64 fairy-tale colors, like the yellow, blue, and purple shades shown here.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Weddings, 2009
  6. Good Thing

    Make a Statement

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    Many brides save their bouquets, but dried flowers can look a tad Miss Havisham. Instead, turn the ribbon used for the stems into a keepsake by having your vows printed on it. Email a JPG image of calligraphed or typed text to Masterstroke Canada; they'll put the words onto ribbon using a thermal-transfer technique.

    Resources

    Calligraphy, John DeCollibus, beyondwordsscript.com. Bouquet, Laura Seita.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Weddings
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