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Project

White Favors

Introduction

A wedding favor may be almost anything: beautiful, ethereal, precious, ephemeral -- even impractical. The only thing it must be is symbolic.

It should serve to remind your friends and relatives of their participation in the union of two people and two families. It is an offering to your guests, one that expresses your gratitude.

A favor need not be elaborate to be expressive. Some favors here, such as the candles wrapped in corrugated paper and the groom's cake boxes, are rather simple and can be assembled quickly. Others, such as the dragee compote and the framed monogram, require a little more planning. All of them will give you the opportunity to rediscover the reason we give favors in the first place. "The best favors use the imagination," says Joy Lewis of Mrs. John L. Strong Fine Stationery in New York City, "which is always the most personal and meaningful way to go about giving a gift."

A thoughtful favor will add a distinct touch to your wedding. At the same time, it can round out and connect an overall theme or color scheme; the wedding favors on these pages, for instance, were all created in shades of white. Whatever motif you choose, you're likely to find that wedding favors have an impact all out of proportion to their size.

Boxed Groom's Cake
Dragee Monogram
Dragee Compote
Potted Orchids
Greeting Candles
Sugar Boxes
Seed Packets
Small Packages

Source
Martha Stewart Weddings, Summer/Fall 1998