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4 Meditation Techniques for Beginners to Try

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If you’re afraid you’ll do it wrong, try guided meditation. This is akin to having a personal trainer at the gym. An instructor talks you through the exercise of clearing and focusing your mind. Find a class at a gym or yoga studio, or listen to sessions—some as brief as five minutes—on apps like Headspace or Insight Timer, which offers guided meditations from luminaries like Eckhart Tolle (both are free from the App Store or Google Play).

 

If you can’t be still, try moving meditation. If you can knit or chop vegetables, you can meditate. “There’s meditation when you’re focusing on making each stitch as you’re knitting,” Schwartz says. Indeed, a series of books by Thich Nhat Hanh—including How to Walk and How to Eat (Parallax Press; $10 each)—provides instruction on how to meditate while engaging in everyday activities.

 

If you don’t have time, try taking a breath. “You can cumulatively meditate—one minute of every hour. That’s all you need,” Schwartz says. “You can do this while in line at Starbucks. Take a breath for two or three seconds, observe the situation, identify how you feel, then exhale and proceed with your life. You’ve just meditated.”

 

4 Types of Meditation to Heal Your Mind and Soul

Anything you can do to silent your mind is a good thing. Whether it's yoga or just sitting in a quiet place to let yourself rest, meditation comes in many forms -- many of them, very easy to accomplish. Here's a guide to some of the most popular practices.

 

1. Mindfulness meditation

You concentrate on one thing, like your breathing. (This is also known as focused-attention meditation.)

 

2. Zen meditation

This form begins in sitting position but can involve movement such as walking.

 

3. Open-monitoring meditation

Like a spectator, you observe the thoughts that come in and out of your wandering mind.

 

4. Vedic meditation

You repeat a word or mantra. (One widely known form is Transcendental Meditation.)

  

The Fascinating Power of Meditation: Mind Over Chatter

Stress is actually a natural biological response -- it's what saves us from dangers in the wild. But, in the modern metropolitan world, this psychological stress might not be so good for us. Stress is actually a natural biological response -- it's what saves us from dangers in the wild. But, in the modern metropolitan world, this psychological stress might not be so good for us. Unfortunately, stress is all around us. You can't avoid it. Whether you are worried about losing your home, your job, or your mind, there is a way to manage the effects of stress. Martha interviews the Editor-in-Chief of the Harvard Mental Health letter, for tips on how to deal with modern stresses.

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