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How to Make a Dry-Erase Board Menu

Nothing makes me sadder than overripe produce or a spoiled bunch of broccoli on its way to the compost bin -- victims of my lack of better meal planning. I’ve been daydreaming about an easy-to-use dinner planner, and voila, here it is, dry-erase et al. May the next broccoli find itself to a happy tummy and befriend some pasta on the way.

petit-collage-dry-erase-board-2-0515.jpg

Materials

-  craft knife or scissors
-  various colored and patterned papers
letters template
-  cutting mat
-  14" x 11" x 1½" picture frame with glass
-  double-sided tape
craft glue
-  two small Mighty Magnets
-  dry-erase marker
-  large ruler

petit-collage-dry-erase-board-1-0515.jpg

Directions

1.  Using a craft knife or scissors, cut out 7 2-inch-by-11-inch (5cm x 28cm) strips of paper. Choose papers that are not too heavily patterned or dark. These will be the backdrop for your menu, and you want your writing to be legible once the board is assembled.

2.  Print out the letters template (adjust the sizing prior to printing if necessary), and cut the first letter for each day of the week out from solid colored paper.

3.  Lay out your paper strips vertically in an appealing order.

4.  Use the cardboard or mat board backing that came with the frame and adhere the strips of paper to it using double-sided tape.

5.  Once these are all in place, use double-sided tape to adhere the paper letters for the days of the week along the left side of the board. Make sure to leave enough room on the left edge of the board so the letters will not be covered by the frame.

6.  Place the board into the frame and reassemble the frame back.

7.  Using your glue, adhere one of the magnets to the top of the frame, and the other to the dry-erase marker to always keep it handy.

8.  Start menu planning!


Tips:
-  This project can be easily scaled up to accommodate more meals or days. Be creative!
-  If you want to keep it simple, alternate two different types or colors of paper.
-  Adhere the Mighty Magnet to the dry-erase marker cap; that way once you need to replace the marker, you can keep the magnetized cap. Cover with paper to customize.

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About the Author

Lorena Siminovich

Originally from Buenos Aires, Lorena Siminovich is a San Francisco-based entrepreneur, designer, author, and illustrator. Lorena has written and illustrated more than 30 books for children, published around the world in many languages.A creative force, she is the founder of Petit Collage, a line of modern room decor and playthings for kids. Launched in 2006 with Lorena’s distinctive...

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