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The 8 Rules for Making Lentil Soup

Hearty and nutritious, vegan or meaty, lentil soup has many forms. Make it a staple of your cold-weather cooking by following our rules to soup success.

Senior Digital Food Editor
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When it’s cold, everyone needs a comforting bowl of soup, and lentil soup wins on so many levels. Lentils are pulses, a member of the legume family, and they are protein packed: One cup of cooked lentils has 6 to 18 grams of protein and is also an excellent source of soluble fiber. And unlike their beany kin, lentils cook up quickly in a soup, making them a great choice for a speedy meal: a satisfying soup made in just one pot.

 

1. The Pulse: Choosing Your Lentils

What to use? Lentils come in different sizes and colors ranging from yellow and red to green and brown, and vary slightly in flavor, texture, and cooking time. The good news is you can use any type of lentil in lentil soup. The other good news: Lentils don’t need to soak as beans do (though you do need to sort and rinse them before cooking). That’s two reasons why lentil soup is such a winner.

 

Different types of lentils cook in different amounts of time. Some, like red lentils, dissolve as they cook and make for a smooth soup. Others, such as green and brown lentils, hold their shape and make a soup with more texture.

 

 

2. Liquid Matters


A basic rule of soup-making is that better-quality broth will create a more richly flavored soup. Chicken or vegetable stock are most often used, but if you have some homemade lamb stock in the freezer, that would create a deeply flavorful base; beef stock is also delicious.

 

Get Martha's Homemade Stock Recipes
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3. It’s Easy Going Vegan


There are so many ways to create a richly flavored soup without meat--with types of lentils, vegetables, herbs, and spices. Yes, you can make a really delicious lentil soup without bacon. (For a vegan soup, make any of our meatless lentil soup recipes using vegetable stock or water rather than chicken stock.)

Get Our (Vegan) Lentil and Bulgur Soup Recipe

 

4. The Flavor Base


A little onion and garlic sauteed in olive oil is all you need to form a flavor base for the soup. A mixture of carrots, onion, and celery brings more aromatic flavors, like in this classic recipe.

 

 

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5. Meaty Additions


Should you want a meaty soup, bacon, sausage or ham hocks are the pork parts most often called for in lentil soup recipes. Try Lentil Soup with Sausage and Kale or Red Lentil Soup with Bacon.

 

 

 

6. Veg It Up


The options are endless: root vegetables such as parsnips, rutabaga, and turnips, add a subtle sweetness to the soup. Mushrooms up the unami factor, while tomatoes stand in for some of the broth and brighten the flavors. Greens, like Swiss chard, can be added close to the end of cooking. 

 

 

7. Change It Up

Lentils are the starting point. Depending on the herbs and spices you use, your soup can be altogether different. Go classic with thyme and bay or curry flavors or fresh ginger. Garnish with cilantro or parsley or chives when you serve. Always start the soup using the same lentils and vegetables and broth combination, but change it up each time by using a different combination of spices or adding parsley and grated Parmesan when you serve.

 

 

8. It Doesn’t Take Long


This 15-minute recipe uses already-cooked lentils, but even when making from scratch, a lentil soup like this Red Lentil and Squash Curry Soup can be ready in as little as 30 minutes. Just cook the soup until lentils are tender but not mushy and any vegetables are cooked through. Choose red lentils for the fastest-cooking soup.

 

Watch how to make one of our favorite lentil soups:

 

 

Get our Favorite Lentil Soup Recipe
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