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Easter Egg Hunt Games to Keep Lil' Bunnies Hoppy

The kids bounce around the yard armed with empty baskets with one goal in mind: snatch up as many decorated eggs as you can. It's a classic sight on Easter Sunday, but that isn't to say that it has to be the same year after year. As the host of the hunt, give your baby bunnies an eggciting new take on collecting their prizes.

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Photography by: Burca Avsar

Treasure Hunt

An Easter egg hunt doesn't have to mean a disordered scramble. For this streamlined search, tuck individual clues in a set of plastic eggs that are marked with vinyl numbers, and have kids look for each one, in order, as a team. The riddle that is hidden in the last egg will point the kids to their basket of treats.

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Relay Race

They're off to the hopping trail! Divide your bitty bunnies into two teams and set them at a starting line marked by a bundle of balloons. At the other end of the lawn, mark a finish line with another bundle of balloons. Each child receives a plastic spoon and each team receives one egg (hard-boiled or plastic, your choice). This egg is balanced on the spoon, which the child holds in his or her teeth. At the "Go!" signal, the first child (carrying the egg) races to the finish line and back again to pass the egg off to their teammate. If the egg falls to the ground, it's okay to place it back onto the spoon, but it must be balanced for the entirety of the course. The first team to have all members finish the race, wins!

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Photography by: Emily Kate Roemer

Make a Match

This game tests who has the best memory. Make matching pairs of colored eggs, dyeing only the tip of the small end (the kids can help with this). Set the eggs face down back in the cartons -- making sure the color is hidden. The first player tries to find a match by turning over two eggs. If they match, the player keeps them and goes again. If not, the eggs are turned face down again and the next player is up. The kids take turns until all the matches are found. Whoever matches the most eggs wins the game.

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Egg Bocce

The traditional lawn-bowling game gets an egg-cellent twist. The object of the game is to see which player can get his or her egg closest to the "pallino" (in this version, a plain white hard-boiled egg). Each child receives a matching set of eggs (hard-boiled or plastic, your choice), taking turns rolling one colored egg underhand across the yard in order to get as close as possible to the pallino. Once every child has had a turn, the players roll the second egg in their matching sets. The players can use their eggs to knock away other eggs or to edge their own first egg closer to the pallino. After the second round, the distance between the eggs and the pallino are measured to see which one is closest. If there is a tie, the player whose egg is in the best condition wins.

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Photography by: Anna Williams

DIY Decorating

Have the kids gather round a crafts table. Hard-cook enough eggs for everybody the day before. Keep the decorating simple with washable markers, stickers, and colorful clip-art paper bands that are easy for small hands to handle. Have the kids vote on the most eggstraordinarily decorated egg (but let them know they can't vote for themselves, those silly chicks).

Shell Crack

Now that they have decorated their eggs, they can break them! Divide kids into pairs. At the signal, have them smash the small ends of their eggs together. The kids with unbroken shells advance to the next round and get paired up again. This goes on until there is one single winner with an uncracked egg.

 

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