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All About

Yellow squash

Explore 53 recipes, 1 article, 1 gallery, 10 videos, and more

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recipe

Steaming food in parchment -- or "en papillote," as it's traditionally called -- is a low-fat way to cook a full meal in one shot: The juices from each ingredient are sealed inside the pouch to flavor the dish. Plus, it makes for a dramatic presentation. Just be careful not to burn yourself when the steam escapes!See illustrations for folding parchment paper.

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recipe

This zesty salsa will last up to four days when refrigerated in a sealed container. It can be served on toasted whole-wheat bread or tofu that is sliced and oven-baked for 10 minutes at 350 degrees. Per serving: 51 calories; 2 g protein; 2 g fat; 8 g carbs; 3 g fiber

recipe

This recipe is adapted from Sarah Copeland's forthcoming book, "Feast" (Chronicle Books).This recipe is a brilliant way to work both greens and fish into your repertoire. The key player is gremolata, an uncooked green sauce; here, arugula gives it a mouthwatering peppery punch that contrasts with tender roasted potatoes, yellow squash, and mild Pacific halibut. The secret to getting that restaurant-quality sear on the fish is very simple: Cook it without turning it over, first on the stove top and then in the oven -- just to finish it off. Perfection.

article

Intensely flavorful and endlessly adaptble, grilled vegetables can be you best friend this summer. Enjoy them hot, cold, or at room temperature, alongside meats, in a sandwich or frittata, or tossed with pasta. But not all vegetables are created equal -- some require precooking before they hit the grill. Check out this handy list before your next cookout and you'll be rewarded with tender, smoky result every time.

recipe

This baked riff on ratatouille may look sophisticated, but it's surprisingly simple. Serve it for brunch or at dinner parties -- and save leftovers to eat straight out of the dish by the forkful.