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  • Overview
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EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT

Brussels Sprouts

Take a close look at a brussels sprout and you will see it really does look like a miniature head of cabbage. When properly cooked, brussels sprouts have the delicate sweetness of great cabbage, but they also have a more complex vegetable flavor. Brussels and cabbage are both members of the Brassica family, which also includes cauliflower, broccoli, turnips, kale, and kohlrabi. The edible buds of the brussels sprout grow up the sides of a single long stalk. And these buds are nutritional powerhouses with potent levels of vitamins C and K, soluble fiber, and a variety of antioxidants.

 

Nutrition aside, brussels sprouts have long suffered a bad rap in the United States, perhaps in part because they were a common Army ration for soldiers fighting overseas through several wars -- eating cold-boiled brussels sprouts out of a metal tin can’t be enjoyable. Add to that the likelihood that most people encountered them overcooked, mushy, and served plain. A 2008 study found brussels sprouts to be the most-hated vegetable in America. This is changing as we move beyond boiling, exploring different methods of cooking and eating them and experimenting with seasonings. In fact, brussels sprouts are trending; Forbes magazine named them one of the top 10 food trends. Seems we are finally wising up to the delicious potential of this nutritional giant.

Take a close look at a brussels sprout and you will see it really does look like a miniature head of cabbage. When properly cooked, brussels sprouts have the delicate sweetness of great cabbage, but they also have a more complex vegetable flavor. Brussels and cabbage are both members of the Brassica family, which also includes cauliflower, broccoli, turnips, kale, and kohlrabi. The edible buds of the brussels sprout grow up the sides of a single long stalk....

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All About Brussels Sprouts

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