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Showing 31-45 of 154 items

All About

Sage

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recipe

If you can, order your turkey from a local farm, and ask for it to be boned with the skin on. The wing and leg bones should be removed, and the turkey tenders should be included. Make sure you have the wing tips, neck, and giblets for the gravy. Rolling the turkey ensures that each slice will include both light and dark meat.

recipe

Follow the recipe for roast turkey to cook the stuffing in the turkey cavity, or bake it separately as directed below. If you prefer to avoid peeling the chestnuts yourself, buy ones that have been cooked and peeled and are sold in jars or cans. You will need 1 1/4 cups.

recipe

Dressed with a little practicality, this diminutive cut is no less iconic than a whole turkey. For the best flavor and texture, brine your turkey breast for six hours -- no more, no less. The vegetables should all be cut to the same size to ensure even cooking.

recipe

This traditional holiday bird brings much more to the table than just great taste. Turkey breast packs more protein than chicken breast or trimmed top loin beefsteak, with just 1 gram of fat per 3-ounce serving, and it contains selenium, which may help prevent certain cancers and heart disease. Get more Thanksgiving menu ideas: Roasted Vegetables Day-After Turkey Soup

recipe

The flavor of fresh sage counterbalances the sweetness of apricots. The dough for scones, like that of biscuits, should be handled as little as possible. Cut out scones by pressing straight through the dough with a bench scraper. Brush the tops with heavy cream, then sprinkle with sanding sugar so scones glisten when they come out of the oven.

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