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All About

Jams

Explore 44 recipes, 1 project, 2 galleries, and more

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Our new favorite jams, jellies, and pickles are every bit as delectable as old-fashioned state-fair winners, but we’ve streamlined the process of making them. Forget what you’ve been told you need -- an enormous pot, boiling-water baths, sterilization guidelines, and so on. Instead, turn out small batches with the fruits and vegetables you find at the farmers’ market on any given day. These pickles and preserves all keep in the fridge or freezer for months -- and each is worthy of a blue ribbon of its own.

recipe

The skins from stone fruit will contribute color and flavor to the jam. But for a smoother mixture, you can start by peeling peaches: Carve an X in the bottom of each and plunge them into boiling water for 30 seconds, then transfer them to an ice-water bath to stop the cooking; the skins will slip off. For plums, just lift the skins out of the cooked jam with a fork.

recipe

The skins from stone fruit will contribute color and flavor to the jam. But for a smoother mixture, you can start by peeling nectarines: Carve an X in the bottom of each and plunge them into boiling water for 30 seconds, then transfer them to an ice-water bath to stop the cooking; the skins will slip off.

recipe

Pepper jelly makes a spicy-sweet match for soft cheeses, such as goat or Camembert (or even cream cheese) -- especially when served atop crackers or crostini. You can also use the jelly as a glaze for chicken or pork: Melt it, then brush it on the meat before roasting or after grilling.