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  • Overview
  • The Formula
  • Amped-Up Flavor
  • Chicken Curry Recipes
  • More ... But Different

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EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT

Chicken Curry

Though it originated in India, chicken curry soon spread widely. Other East Asian countries, South America, and the Caribbean all have their takes on this popular dish, and even within that variety, there are many different recipes and spice blends. So just what is a curry? It comes from the southern Indian word "kari,"  which means sauce, and it's kind of a catch-all term. A chicken curry can be very hot (spicy) or not, and everywhere in between. It may be red or green or yellow, or creamy, with coconut milk. What unites all chicken curry dishes is the braising of chicken pieces with a mix or paste of curry spices.

 

Some curry cooks swear you need to grind your own spice blend, but many rely on prepared curry powders, using fresh ginger and garlic along with a store-bought mix. Spices found in many curries include cumin, tumeric, coriander, and fenugreek. Whether an Indian, Sri Lankan, Jamaican, or Thai curry, the finished dish is most often served with rice.

Though it originated in India, chicken curry soon spread widely. Other East Asian countries, South America, and the Caribbean all have their takes on this popular dish, and even within that variety, there are many different recipes and spice blends. So just what is a curry? It comes from the southern Indian word "kari,"  which means sauce, and it's kind of a catch-all term. A chicken curry can be very hot (spicy) or not, and everywhere in between. It may...

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All About Chicken Curry

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recipe

This dish is traditionally served with white rice and chutney, and tastes even better the day after its made. Try adding 1/2 cup of shredded coconut before serving for a twist. From the book "Lucinda's Authentic Jamaican Kitchen," by Lucinda Scala Quinn (Wiley).

recipe

Thai curry paste, not to be confused with curry powder, is a blend of chile peppers, garlic, black pepper, coriander, and other ingredients. It comes in green and red varieties, which you'll find in the international aisle -- for this recipe, choose green.

recipe

Serve this dish with rice and accompaniments, such as plain yogurt, raisins, toasted almonds, and store-bought mango chutney. Curry powder comes in many varieties. Madras, used here, is spicier.